skip to main content

Search for: All records

Creators/Authors contains: "Sun, Xin"

Note: When clicking on a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) number, you will be taken to an external site maintained by the publisher. Some full text articles may not yet be available without a charge during the embargo (administrative interval).
What is a DOI Number?

Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site.

  1. Free, publicly-accessible full text available February 1, 2023
  2. Free, publicly-accessible full text available February 1, 2023
  3. Free, publicly-accessible full text available May 6, 2023
  4. Abstract Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) are unique marine regions where broad redox gradients stimulate biogeochemical cycles. Despite the important and unique role of OMZ microbes in these cycles, they are less characterized than microbes from the oxic ocean. Here we recovered 39 high- and medium-quality metagenome-assembled genomes (MAGs) from the Eastern Tropical South Pacific OMZ. More than half of these MAGs were not represented at the species level among 2631 MAGs from global marine datasets. OMZ MAGs were dominated by denitrifiers catalyzing nitrogen loss and especially MAGs with partial denitrification metabolism. A novel bacterial genome with nitrate-reducing potential could only be assigned to the phylum level. A Marine-Group II archaeon was found to be a versatile denitrifier, with the potential capability to respire multiple nitrogen compounds including N 2 O. The newly discovered denitrifying MAGs will improve our understanding of microbial adaptation strategies and the evolution of denitrification in the tree of life.
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available December 1, 2022
  5. Free, publicly-accessible full text available October 17, 2023
  6. Abstract The ocean is a net source of N 2 O, a potent greenhouse gas and ozone-depleting agent. However, the removal of N 2 O via microbial N 2 O consumption is poorly constrained and rate measurements have been restricted to anoxic waters. Here we expand N 2 O consumption measurements from anoxic zones to the sharp oxygen gradient above them, and experimentally determine kinetic parameters in both oxic and anoxic seawater for the first time. We find that the substrate affinity, O 2 tolerance, and community composition of N 2 O-consuming microbes in oxic waters differ from those in the underlying anoxic layers. Kinetic parameters determined here are used to model in situ N 2 O production and consumption rates. Estimated in situ rates differ from measured rates, confirming the necessity to consider kinetics when predicting N 2 O cycling. Microbes from the oxic layer consume N 2 O under anoxic conditions at a much faster rate than microbes from anoxic zones. These experimental results are in keeping with model results which indicate that N 2 O consumption likely takes place above the oxygen deficient zone (ODZ). Thus, the dynamic layer with steep O 2 and N 2 Omore »gradients right above the ODZ is a previously ignored potential gatekeeper of N 2 O and should be accounted for in the marine N 2 O budget.« less
  7. Nitrous oxide (N 2 O) is a potent greenhouse gas and an ozone destroying substance. Yet, clear step-by-step protocols to measure N 2 O transformation rates in freshwater and marine environments are still lacking, challenging inter-comparability efforts. Here we present detailed protocols currently used by leading experts in the field to measure water-column N 2 O production and consumption rates in both marine and other aquatic environments. We present example 15 N-tracer incubation experiments in marine environments as well as templates to calculate both N 2 O production and consumption rates. We discuss important considerations and recommendations regarding (1) precautions to prevent oxygen (O 2 ) contamination during low-oxygen and anoxic incubations, (2) preferred bottles and stoppers, (3) procedures for 15 N-tracer addition, and (4) the choice of a fixative. We finally discuss data reporting and archiving. We expect these protocols will make 15 N-labeled N 2 O transformation rate measurements more accessible to the wider community and facilitate future inter-comparison between different laboratories.