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  1. Abstract Understanding the halo–galaxy connection is fundamental in order to improve our knowledge on the nature and properties of dark matter. In this work, we build a model that infers the mass of a halo given the positions, velocities, stellar masses, and radii of the galaxies it hosts. In order to capture information from correlations among galaxy properties and their phase space, we use Graph Neural Networks (GNNs), which are designed to work with irregular and sparse data. We train our models on galaxies from more than 2000 state-of-the-art simulations from the Cosmology and Astrophysics with MachinE Learning Simulations project. Our model, which accounts for cosmological and astrophysical uncertainties, is able to constrain the masses of the halos with a ∼0.2 dex accuracy. Furthermore, a GNN trained on a suite of simulations is able to preserve part of its accuracy when tested on simulations run with a different code that utilizes a distinct subgrid physics model, showing the robustness of our method. The PyTorch Geometric implementation of the GNN is publicly available on GitHub ( https://github.com/PabloVD/HaloGraphNet ).
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available August 1, 2023
  2. Abstract

    We presentGIGANTES, the most extensive and realistic void catalog suite ever released—containing over 1 billion cosmic voids covering a volume larger than the observable universe, more than 20 TB of data, and created by running the void finderVIDEonQUIJOTE’s halo simulations. TheGIGANTESsuite, spanning thousands of cosmological models, opens up the study of voids, answering compelling questions: Do voids carry unique cosmological information? How is this information correlated with galaxy information? Leveraging the large number of voids in theGIGANTESsuite, our Fisher constraints demonstrate voids contain additional information, critically tightening constraints on cosmological parameters. We use traditional void summary statistics (void size function, void density profile) and the void autocorrelation function, which independently yields an error of 0.13 eV on ∑mνfor a 1h−3Gpc3simulation, without cosmic microwave background priors. Combining halos and voids we forecast an error of 0.09 eV from the same volume, representing a gain of 60% compared to halos alone. Extrapolating to next generation multi-Gpc3surveys such as the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument, Euclid, the Spectro-Photometer for the History of the Universe and Ices Explorer, and the Roman Space Telescope, we expect voids should yield an independent determination of neutrino mass. Crucially,GIGANTESis the first void catalog suite expressly built for intensivemore »machine-learning exploration. We illustrate this by training a neural network to perform likelihood-free inference on the void size function, giving a ∼20% constraint on Ωm. Cosmology problems provide an impetus to develop novel deep-learning techniques. WithGIGANTES, machine learning gains an impressive data set, offering unique problems that will stimulate new techniques.

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  3. Abstract Traditional large-scale models of reionization usually employ simple deterministic relations between halo mass and luminosity to predict how reionization proceeds. We here examine the impact on modeling reionization of using more detailed models for the ionizing sources as identified within the 100 h −1 Mpc cosmological hydrodynamic simulation S imba , coupled with postprocessed radiative transfer. Comparing with simple (one-to-one) models, the main difference with using S imba sources is the scatter in the relation between dark matter halos and star formation, and hence ionizing emissivity. We find that, at the power spectrum level, the ionization morphology remains mostly unchanged, regardless of the variability in the number of sources or escape fraction. In particular, the power spectrum shape remains unaffected and its amplitude changes slightly by less than 5%–10%, throughout reionization, depending on the scale and neutral fraction. Our results show that simplified models of ionizing sources remain viable to efficiently model the structure of reionization on cosmological scales, although the precise progress of reionization requires accounting for the scatter induced by astrophysical effects.
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available May 1, 2023
  4. Free, publicly-accessible full text available December 1, 2022
  5. Free, publicly-accessible full text available April 1, 2023
  6. Abstract Many different studies have shown that a wealth of cosmological information resides on small, nonlinear scales. Unfortunately, there are two challenges to overcome to utilize that information. First, we do not know the optimal estimator that will allow us to retrieve the maximum information. Second, baryonic effects impact that regime significantly and in a poorly understood manner. Ideally, we would like to use an estimator that extracts the maximum cosmological information while marginalizing over baryonic effects. In this work we show that neural networks can achieve that when considering some simple scenarios. We made use of data where the maximum amount of cosmological information is known: power spectra and 2D Gaussian density fields. We also contaminate the data with simplified baryonic effects and train neural networks to predict the value of the cosmological parameters. For this data, we show that neural networks can (1) extract the maximum available cosmological information, (2) marginalize over baryonic effects, and (3) extract cosmological information that is buried in the regime dominated by baryonic physics. We also show that neural networks learn the priors of the data they are trained on, affecting their extrapolation properties. We conclude that a promising strategy to maximize themore »scientific return of cosmological experiments is to train neural networks on state-of-the-art numerical simulations with different strengths and implementations of baryonic effects.« less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available March 1, 2023
  7. Abstract Uncertain feedback processes in galaxies affect the distribution of matter, currently limiting the power of weak lensing surveys. If we can identify cosmological statistics that are robust against these uncertainties, or constrain these effects by other means, then we can enhance the power of current and upcoming observations from weak lensing surveys such as DES, Euclid, the Rubin Observatory, and the Roman Space Telescope. In this work, we investigate the potential of the electron density auto-power spectrum as a robust probe of cosmology and baryonic feedback. We use a suite of (magneto-)hydrodynamic simulations from the CAMELS project and perform an idealized analysis to forecast statistical uncertainties on a limited set of cosmological and physically-motivated astrophysical parameters. We find that the electron number density auto-correlation, measurable through either kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich observations or through Fast Radio Burst dispersion measures, provides tight constraints on Ω m and the mean baryon fraction in intermediate-mass halos, f̅ bar . By obtaining an empirical measure for the associated systematic uncertainties, we find these constraints to be largely robust to differences in baryonic feedback models implemented in hydrodynamic simulations. We further discuss the main caveats associated with our analysis, and point out possible directions for futuremore »work.« less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available April 1, 2023
  8. Abstract We use a generic formalism designed to search for relations in high-dimensional spaces to determine if the total mass of a subhalo can be predicted from other internal properties such as velocity dispersion, radius, or star formation rate. We train neural networks using data from the Cosmology and Astrophysics with MachinE Learning Simulations project and show that the model can predict the total mass of a subhalo with high accuracy: more than 99% of the subhalos have a predicted mass within 0.2 dex of their true value. The networks exhibit surprising extrapolation properties, being able to accurately predict the total mass of any type of subhalo containing any kind of galaxy at any redshift from simulations with different cosmologies, astrophysics models, subgrid physics, volumes, and resolutions, indicating that the network may have found a universal relation. We then use different methods to find equations that approximate the relation found by the networks and derive new analytic expressions that predict the total mass of a subhalo from its radius, velocity dispersion, and maximum circular velocity. We show that in some regimes, the analytic expressions are more accurate than the neural networks. The relation found by the neural network and approximatedmore »by the analytic equation bear similarities to the virial theorem.« less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available March 1, 2023
  9. Abstract Galaxies can be characterized by many internal properties such as stellar mass, gas metallicity, and star formation rate. We quantify the amount of cosmological and astrophysical information that the internal properties of individual galaxies and their host dark matter halos contain. We train neural networks using hundreds of thousands of galaxies from 2000 state-of-the-art hydrodynamic simulations with different cosmologies and astrophysical models of the CAMELS project to perform likelihood-free inference on the value of the cosmological and astrophysical parameters. We find that knowing the internal properties of a single galaxy allows our models to infer the value of Ω m , at fixed Ω b , with a ∼10% precision, while no constraint can be placed on σ 8 . Our results hold for any type of galaxy, central or satellite, massive or dwarf, at all considered redshifts, z ≤ 3, and they incorporate uncertainties in astrophysics as modeled in CAMELS. However, our models are not robust to changes in subgrid physics due to the large intrinsic differences the two considered models imprint on galaxy properties. We find that the stellar mass, stellar metallicity, and maximum circular velocity are among the most important galaxy properties to determine the valuemore »of Ω m . We believe that our results can be explained by considering that changes in the value of Ω m , or potentially Ω b /Ω m , affect the dark matter content of galaxies, which leaves a signature in galaxy properties distinct from the one induced by galactic processes. Our results suggest that the low-dimensional manifold hosting galaxy properties provides a tight direct link between cosmology and astrophysics.« less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available April 1, 2023
  10. Abstract

    It is important to understand the cycle of baryons through the circumgalactic medium (CGM) in the context of galaxy formation and evolution. In this study, we forecast constraints on the feedback processes heating the CGM with current and future Sunyaev–Zeldovich (SZ) observations. To constrain these processes, we use a suite of cosmological simulations, the Cosmology and Astrophysics with MachinE Learning Simulations (CAMELS). CAMELS varies four different feedback parameters of two previously existing hydrodynamical simulations, IllustrisTNG and SIMBA. We capture the dependences of SZ radial profiles on these feedback parameters with an emulator, calculate their derivatives, and forecast future constraints on these feedback parameters from upcoming experiments. We find that for a galaxy sample similar to what would be obtained with the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument at the Simons Observatory, all four feedback parameters can be constrained (some within the 10% level), indicating that future observations will be able to further restrict the parameter space for these subgrid models. Given the modeled galaxy sample and forecasted errors in this work, we find that the inner SZ profiles contribute more to the constraining power than the outer profiles. Finally, we find that, despite the wide range of parameter variation in activemore »galactic feedback in the CAMELS simulation suite, we cannot reproduce the thermal SZ signal of galaxies selected by the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey as measured by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope.

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