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  1. Free, publicly-accessible full text available October 1, 2023
  2. Abstract

    The device concept of ferroelectric-based negative capacitance (NC) transistors offers a promising route for achieving energy-efficient logic applications that can outperform the conventional semiconductor technology, while viable operation mechanisms remain a central topic of debate. In this work, we report steep slope switching in MoS2transistors back-gated by single-layer polycrystalline PbZr0.35Ti0.65O3. The devices exhibit current switching ratios up to 8 × 106within an ultra-low gate voltage window of$$V_{{{\mathrm{g}}}} = \pm \! 0.5$$Vg=±0.5V and subthreshold swing (SS) as low as 9.7 mV decade−1at room temperature, transcending the 60 mV decade−1Boltzmann limit without involving additional dielectric layers. Theoretical modeling reveals the dominant role of the metastable polar states within domain walls in enabling the NC mode, which is corroborated by the relation between SS and domain wall density. Our findings shed light on a hysteresis-free mechanism for NC operation, providing a simple yet effective material strategy for developing low-power 2D nanoelectronics.

  3. Learning policies in simulation is promising for reducing human effort when training robot controllers. This is especially true for soft robots that are more adaptive and safe but also more difficult to accurately model and control. The sim2real gap is the main barrier to successfully transfer policies from simulation to a real robot. System identification can be applied to reduce this gap but traditional identification methods require a lot of manual tuning. Data-driven alternatives can tune dynamical models directly from data but are often data hungry, which also incorporates human effort in collecting data. This work proposes a data-driven, end-to-end differentiable simulator focused on the exciting but challenging domain of tensegrity robots. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first differentiable physics engine for tensegrity robots that supports cable, contact, and actuation modeling. The aim is to develop a reasonably simplified, data-driven simulation, which can learn approximate dynamics with limited ground truth data. The dynamics must be accurate enough to generate policies that can be transferred back to the ground-truth system. As a first step in this direction, the current work demonstrates sim2sim transfer, where the unknown physical model of MuJoCo acts as a ground truth system.more »Two different tensegrity robots are used for evaluation and learning of locomotion policies, a 6-bar and a 3-bar tensegrity. The results indicate that only 0.25% of ground truth data are needed to train a policy that works on the ground truth system when the differentiable engine is used for training against training the policy directly on the ground truth system.« less
  4. Numerous recent advances in robotics have been inspired by the biological principle of tensile integrity — or “tensegrity”— to achieve remarkable feats of dexterity and resilience. Tensegrity robots contain compliant networks of rigid struts and soft cables, allowing them to change their shape by adjusting their internal tension. Local rigidity along the struts provides support to carry electronics and scientific payloads, while global compliance enabled by the flexible interconnections of struts and cables allows a tensegrity to distribute impacts and prevent damage. Numerous techniques have been proposed for designing and simulating tensegrity robots, giving rise to a wide range of locomotion modes including rolling, vibrating, hopping, and crawling. Here, we review progress in the burgeoning field of tensegrity robotics, highlighting several emerging challenges, including automated design, state sensing, and kinodynamic motion planning.