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  1. Abstract

    Sequencing, assembly, and annotation of the 26.5 Gbp hexaploid genome of coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) was completed leading toward discovery of genes related to climate adaptation and investigation of the origin of the hexaploid genome. Deep-coverage short-read Illumina sequencing data from haploid tissue from a single seed were combined with long-read Oxford Nanopore Technologies sequencing data from diploid needle tissue to create an initial assembly, which was then scaffolded using proximity ligation data to produce a highly contiguous final assembly, SESE 2.1, with a scaffold N50 size of 44.9 Mbp. The assembly included several scaffolds that span entire chromosome arms, confirmed by the presence of telomere and centromere sequences on the ends of the scaffolds. The structural annotation produced 118,906 genes with 113 containing introns that exceed 500 Kbp in length and one reaching 2 Mb. Nearly 19 Gbp of the genome represented repetitive content with the vast majority characterized as long terminal repeats, with a 2.9:1 ratio of Copia to Gypsy elements that may aid in gene expression control. Comparison of coast redwood to other conifers revealed species-specific expansions for a plethora of abiotic and biotic stress response genes, including those involved in fungal disease resistance, detoxification, and physical injury/structural remodeling and othersmore »supporting flavonoid biosynthesis. Analysis of multiple genes that exist in triplicate in coast redwood but only once in its diploid relative, giant sequoia, supports a previous hypothesis that the hexaploidy is the result of autopolyploidy rather than any hybridizations with separate but closely related conifer species.

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  2. Abstract Background The release of the first reference genome of walnut (Juglans regia L.) enabled many achievements in the characterization of walnut genetic and functional variation. However, it is highly fragmented, preventing the integration of genetic, transcriptomic, and proteomic information to fully elucidate walnut biological processes. Findings Here, we report the new chromosome-scale assembly of the walnut reference genome (Chandler v2.0) obtained by combining Oxford Nanopore long-read sequencing with chromosome conformation capture (Hi-C) technology. Relative to the previous reference genome, the new assembly features an 84.4-fold increase in N50 size, with the 16 chromosomal pseudomolecules assembled and representing 95% of its total length. Using full-length transcripts from single-molecule real-time sequencing, we predicted 37,554 gene models, with a mean gene length higher than the previous gene annotations. Most of the new protein-coding genes (90%) present both start and stop codons, which represents a significant improvement compared with Chandler v1.0 (only 48%). We then tested the potential impact of the new chromosome-level genome on different areas of walnut research. By studying the proteome changes occurring during male flower development, we observed that the virtual proteome obtained from Chandler v2.0 presents fewer artifacts than the previous reference genome, enabling the identification of amore »new potential pollen allergen in walnut. Also, the new chromosome-scale genome facilitates in-depth studies of intraspecies genetic diversity by revealing previously undetected autozygous regions in Chandler, likely resulting from inbreeding, and 195 genomic regions highly differentiated between Western and Eastern walnut cultivars. Conclusion Overall, Chandler v2.0 will serve as a valuable resource to better understand and explore walnut biology.« less