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Creators/Authors contains: "Yannuzzi, Michael"

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  1. This paper investigates using a sampling-based approach, the RRT*, to reconfigure a 2D set of connected tiles in complex environments, where multiple obstacles might be present. Since the target application is automated building of discrete, cellular structures using mobile robots, there are constraints that determine what tiles can be picked up and where they can be dropped off during reconfiguration. We compare our approach to two algorithms as global and local planners, and show that we are able to find more efficient build sequences using a reasonable amount of samples, in environments with varying degrees of obstacle space. 
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  2. null (Ed.)
    We consider recognition and reconfiguration of lattice-based cellular structures by very simple robots with only basic functionality. The underlying motivation is the construction and modification of space facilities of enormous dimensions, where the combination of new materials with extremely simple robots promises structures of previously unthinkable size and flexibility; this is also closely related to the newly emerging field of programmable matter. Aiming for large-scale scalability, both in terms of the number of the cellular components of a structure, as well as the number of robots that are being deployed for construction requires simple yet robust robots and mechanisms, while also dealing with various basic constraints, such as connectivity of a structure during reconfiguration. To this end, we propose an approach that combines ultra-light, cellular building materials with extremely simple robots. We develop basic algorithmic methods that are able to detect and reconfigure arbitrary cellular structures, based on robots that have only constant-sized memory. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate the feasibility of this approach for specific cellular materials and robots that have been developed at NASA. 
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  3. In this video, we consider recognition and reconfiguration of lattice-based cellular structures by very simple robots with only basic functionality. The underlying motivation is the construction and modification of space facilities of enormous dimensions, where the combination of new materials with extremely simple robots promises structures of previously unthinkable size and flexibility. We present algorithmic methods that are able to detect and reconfigure arbitrary polyominoes, based on finite-state robots, while also preserving connectivity of a structure during reconfiguration. Specific results include methods for determining a bounding box, scaling a given arrangement, and adapting more general algorithms for transforming polyominoes. 
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