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  1. Abstract Overly restrictive eligibility criteria for clinical trials may limit the generalizability of the trial results to their target real-world patient populations. We developed a novel machine learning approach using large collections of real-world data (RWD) to better inform clinical trial eligibility criteria design. We extracted patients’ clinical events from electronic health records (EHRs), which include demographics, diagnoses, and drugs, and assumed certain compositions of these clinical events within an individual’s EHRs can determine the subphenotypes—homogeneous clusters of patients, where patients within each subgroup share similar clinical characteristics. We introduced an outcome-guided probabilistic model to identify those subphenotypes, such that the patients within the same subgroup not only share similar clinical characteristics but also at similar risk levels of encountering severe adverse events (SAEs). We evaluated our algorithm on two previously conducted clinical trials with EHRs from the OneFlorida+ Clinical Research Consortium. Our model can clearly identify the patient subgroups who are more likely to suffer or not suffer from SAEs as subphenotypes in a transparent and interpretable way. Our approach identified a set of clinical topics and derived novel patient representations based on them. Each clinical topic represents a certain clinical event composition pattern learned from the patient EHRs. Tested on both trials, patient subgroup (#SAE=0) and patient subgroup (#SAE>0) can be well-separated by k-means clustering using the inferred topics. The inferred topics characterized as likely to align with the patient subgroup (#SAE>0) revealed meaningful combinations of clinical features and can provide data-driven recommendations for refining the exclusion criteria of clinical trials. The proposed supervised topic modeling approach can infer the clinical topics from the subphenotypes with or without SAEs. The potential rules for describing the patient subgroups with SAEs can be further derived to inform the design of clinical trial eligibility criteria. 
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    Free, publicly-accessible full text available December 1, 2024
  2. Target trial emulation is the process of mimicking target randomized trials using real-world data, where effective confounding control for unbiased treatment effect estimation remains a main challenge. Although various approaches have been proposed for this challenge, a systematic evaluation is still lacking. Here we emulated trials for thousands of medications from two large-scale real-world data warehouses, covering over 10 years of clinical records for over 170 million patients, aiming to identify new indications of approved drugs for Alzheimer’s disease. We assessed different propensity score models under the inverse probability of treatment weighting framework and suggested a model selection strategy for improved baseline covariate balancing. We also found that the deep learning-based propensity score model did not necessarily outperform logistic regression-based methods in covariate balancing. Finally, we highlighted five top-ranked drugs (pantoprazole, gabapentin, atorvastatin, fluticasone, and omeprazole) originally intended for other indications with potential benefits for Alzheimer’s patients. 
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    Free, publicly-accessible full text available December 1, 2024
  3. Abstract Objectives

    The study sought to test the feasibility of using Twitter data to assess determinants of consumers’ health behavior toward human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination informed by the Integrated Behavior Model (IBM).

    Materials and Methods

    We used 3 Twitter datasets spanning from 2014 to 2018. We preprocessed and geocoded the tweets, and then built a rule-based model that classified each tweet into either promotional information or consumers’ discussions. We applied topic modeling to discover major themes and subsequently explored the associations between the topics learned from consumers’ discussions and the responses of HPV-related questions in the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS).

    Results

    We collected 2 846 495 tweets and analyzed 335 681 geocoded tweets. Through topic modeling, we identified 122 high-quality topics. The most discussed consumer topic is “cervical cancer screening”; while in promotional tweets, the most popular topic is to increase awareness of “HPV causes cancer.” A total of 87 of the 122 topics are correlated between promotional information and consumers’ discussions. Guided by IBM, we examined the alignment between our Twitter findings and the results obtained from HINTS. Thirty-five topics can be mapped to HINTS questions by keywords, 112 topics can be mapped to IBM constructs, and 45 topics have statistically significant correlations with HINTS responses in terms of geographic distributions.

    Conclusions

    Mining Twitter to assess consumers’ health behaviors can not only obtain results comparable to surveys, but also yield additional insights via a theory-driven approach. Limitations exist; nevertheless, these encouraging results impel us to develop innovative ways of leveraging social media in the changing health communication landscape.

     
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