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  1. Abstract

    Ultrafast high-brightness X-ray pulses have proven invaluable for a broad range of research. Such pulses are typically generated via synchrotron emission from relativistic electron bunches using large-scale facilities. Recently, significantly more compact X-ray sources based on laser-wakefield accelerated (LWFA) electron beams have been demonstrated. In particular, laser-driven sources, where the radiation is generated by transverse oscillations of electrons within the plasma accelerator structure (so-called betatron oscillations) can generate highly-brilliant ultrashort X-ray pulses using a comparably simple setup. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a method to markedly enhance the parameters of LWFA-driven betatron X-ray emission in a proof-of-principle experiment. We show a significant increase in the number of generated photons by specifically manipulating the amplitude of the betatron oscillations by using our novel Transverse Oscillating Bubble Enhanced Betatron Radiation scheme. We realize this through an orchestrated evolution of the temporal laser pulse shape and the accelerating plasma structure. This leads to controlled off-axis injection of electrons that perform large-amplitude collective transverse betatron oscillations, resulting in increased radiation emission. Our concept holds the promise for a method to optimize the X-ray parameters for specific applications, such as time-resolved investigations with spatial and temporal atomic resolution or advanced high-resolution imaging modalities, and themore »generation of X-ray beams with even higher peak and average brightness.

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  2. Free, publicly-accessible full text available February 11, 2023
  3. Abstract Motivation Graph embedding learning that aims to automatically learn low-dimensional node representations, has drawn increasing attention in recent years. To date, most recent graph embedding methods are evaluated on social and information networks and are not comprehensively studied on biomedical networks under systematic experiments and analyses. On the other hand, for a variety of biomedical network analysis tasks, traditional techniques such as matrix factorization (which can be seen as a type of graph embedding methods) have shown promising results, and hence there is a need to systematically evaluate the more recent graph embedding methods (e.g. random walk-based and neural network-based) in terms of their usability and potential to further the state-of-the-art. Results We select 11 representative graph embedding methods and conduct a systematic comparison on 3 important biomedical link prediction tasks: drug-disease association (DDA) prediction, drug–drug interaction (DDI) prediction, protein–protein interaction (PPI) prediction; and 2 node classification tasks: medical term semantic type classification, protein function prediction. Our experimental results demonstrate that the recent graph embedding methods achieve promising results and deserve more attention in the future biomedical graph analysis. Compared with three state-of-the-art methods for DDAs, DDIs and protein function predictions, the recent graph embedding methods achieve competitive performancemore »without using any biological features and the learned embeddings can be treated as complementary representations for the biological features. By summarizing the experimental results, we provide general guidelines for properly selecting graph embedding methods and setting their hyper-parameters for different biomedical tasks. Availability and implementation As part of our contributions in the paper, we develop an easy-to-use Python package with detailed instructions, BioNEV, available at: https://github.com/xiangyue9607/BioNEV, including all source code and datasets, to facilitate studying various graph embedding methods on biomedical tasks. Supplementary information Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.« less