skip to main content

Attention:

The NSF Public Access Repository (NSF-PAR) system and access will be unavailable from 11:00 PM ET on Friday, July 12 until 2:00 AM ET on Saturday, July 13 due to maintenance. We apologize for the inconvenience.


Search for: All records

Creators/Authors contains: "Zhang, Qiuting"

Note: When clicking on a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) number, you will be taken to an external site maintained by the publisher. Some full text articles may not yet be available without a charge during the embargo (administrative interval).
What is a DOI Number?

Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site.

  1. Free, publicly-accessible full text available October 9, 2024
  2. Biofilms are aggregates of bacterial cells surrounded by an extracellular matrix. Much progress has been made in studying biofilm growth on solid substrates; however, little is known about the biophysical mechanisms underlying biofilm development in three-dimensional confined environments in which the biofilm-dwelling cells must push against and even damage the surrounding environment to proliferate. Here, combining single-cell imaging, mutagenesis, and rheological measurement, we reveal the key morphogenesis steps ofVibrio choleraebiofilms embedded in hydrogels as they grow by four orders of magnitude from their initial size. We show that the morphodynamics and cell ordering in embedded biofilms are fundamentally different from those of biofilms on flat surfaces. Treating embedded biofilms as inclusions growing in an elastic medium, we quantitatively show that the stiffness contrast between the biofilm and its environment determines biofilm morphology and internal architecture, selecting between spherical biofilms with no cell ordering and oblate ellipsoidal biofilms with high cell ordering. When embedded in stiff gels, cells self-organize into a bipolar structure that resembles the molecular ordering in nematic liquid crystal droplets. In vitro biomechanical analysis shows that cell ordering arises from stress transmission across the biofilm–environment interface, mediated by specific matrix components. Our imaging technique and theoretical approach are generalizable to other biofilm-forming species and potentially to biofilms embedded in mucus or host tissues as during infection. Our results open an avenue to understand how confined cell communities grow by means of a compromise between their inherent developmental program and the mechanical constraints imposed by the environment.

     
    more » « less
  3. null (Ed.)
    Biological systems have a remarkable capability of synthesizing multifunctional materials that are adapted for specific physiological and ecological needs. When exploring structure–function relationships related to multifunctionality in nature, it can be a challenging task to address performance synergies, trade-offs, and the relative importance of different functions in biological materials, which, in turn, can hinder our ability to successfully develop their synthetic bioinspired counterparts. Here, we investigate such relationships between the mechanical and optical properties in a multifunctional biological material found in the highly protective yet conspicuously colored exoskeleton of the flower beetle, Torynorrhina flammea . Combining experimental, computational, and theoretical approaches, we demonstrate that a micropillar-reinforced photonic multilayer in the beetle’s exoskeleton simultaneously enhances mechanical robustness and optical appearance, giving rise to optical damage tolerance. Compared with plain multilayer structures, stiffer vertical micropillars increase stiffness and elastic recovery, restrain the formation of shear bands, and enhance delamination resistance. The micropillars also scatter the reflected light at larger polar angles, enhancing the first optical diffraction order, which makes the reflected color visible from a wider range of viewing angles. The synergistic effect of the improved angular reflectivity and damage localization capability contributes to the optical damage tolerance. Our systematic structural analysis of T. flammea ’s different color polymorphs and parametric optical and mechanical modeling further suggest that the beetle’s microarchitecture is optimized toward maximizing the first-order optical diffraction rather than its mechanical stiffness. These findings shed light on material-level design strategies utilized in biological systems for achieving multifunctionality and could thus inform bioinspired material innovations. 
    more » « less
  4. null (Ed.)
  5. Water droplet transport on fibers is of great importance for achieving high water collection efficiency from fog. Here, we exploit a new droplet sliding mechanism to accelerate the droplet coalescence and collection for highly efficient fog harvesting by coating hydrophilic microfibers with superhydrophobic layers of assembled carbon nanoparticles. We find that during the initial water collection, unlike the pinned droplets having axisymmetric barrel shapes wrapped around uncoated microfibers, the hanging droplets on coated microfibers with non-wrapping clamshell shapes are highly mobile due to their lower contact hysteresis adhesion; these are observed to oscillate, coalesce, and sweep the growing droplets along the horizontally placed microfibers. The driving force for droplet transport is mainly ascribed to the coalescence energy release and fog flow. After introducing small gravity force by tilting coated microfibers with a small angle of 5°, we find that it can effectively drive the oscillating mobile droplets for directional transport by rapidly sweeping the droplets with a much higher frequency. Finally, the water collection rate from fog on uncoated microfibers over a prolonged duration is found to be improved over 2 times after superhydrophobic coating, and it is further enhanced over 5 times after a small tilting angle of 5°. 
    more » « less
  6. Abstract

    Kirigami, the ancient paper art of cutting, has recently emerged as a new approach to construct metamaterials with novel properties imparted by cuts. However, most studies are limited to thin sheets‐based 2D kirigami metamaterials with specific forms and limited reconfigurability due to planar connection constraints of cut units. Here, 3D modular kirigami is introduced by cutting bulk materials into spatially closed‐loop connected cut cubes to construct a new class of 3D kirigami metamaterials. The module is transformable with multiple degrees of freedom that can transform into versatile distinct daughter building blocks. Their conformable assembly creates a wealth of reconfigurable and disassemblable metamaterials with diverse structures and unique properties, including reconfigurable 1D column‐like materials, 2D lattice‐like metamaterials with phase transition of chirality, as well as 3D frustration‐free multilayered metamaterials with 3D auxetic behaviors and programmable deformation modes. This study largely expands the design space of kirigami metamaterials from 2D to 3D.

     
    more » « less
  7. We studied the wetting behavior of multiscale self-similar hierarchical wrinkled surfaces. The hierarchical surface was fabricated on poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) substrates by manipulating the sequential strain release and combined plasma/ultraviolet ozone (UVO) treatment. The generated structured surface shows an independently controlled dual-scale roughness with level-1 small-wavelength wrinkles (wavelength of 700–1500 nm and amplitude of 50–500 nm) resting on level-2 large-wavelength wrinkles (wavelength of 15–35 μm and amplitude of 3.5–5 μm), as well as accompanying orthogonal cracks. By tuning the aspect ratio of hierarchical wrinkles, the degree of wetting anisotropy in hierarchical wrinkled surfaces, defined as the contact angle difference between the parallel and perpendicular directions to the wrinkle grooves, is found to change between 3° and 9°. Through both experimental characterization (confocal fluorescence imaging) and theoretical analyses, we showed that the wetting state in the hierarchical wrinkled surface is in the Wenzel wetting state. We found that the measured apparent contact angle is larger than the theoretically predicted Wenzel contact angle, which is found to be attributed to the three-phase contact line pinning effect of both wrinkles and cracks that generates energetic barriers during the contact line motion. This is evidenced by the observed sudden drop of over 20° in the static contact angles along both perpendicular and parallel directions after slight vibration perturbation. Finally, we concluded that the observed small degree of wetting anisotropy in the hierarchical wrinkled surfaces mainly arises from the competition between orthogonal wrinkles and cracks in the contact line pinning. 
    more » « less