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  1. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified and replicated many genetic variants that are associated with diseases and disease-related complex traits. However, the biological mechanisms underlying these identified associations remain largely elusive. Exploring the biological mechanisms underlying these associations requires identifying trait-relevant tissues and cell types, as genetic variants likely influence complex traits in a tissue- and cell type-specific manner. Recently, several statistical methods have been developed to integrate genomic data with GWASs for identifying trait-relevant tissues and cell types. These methods often rely on different genomic information and use different statistical models for trait-tissue relevance inference. Here, we present a comprehensive technical review to summarize ten existing methods for trait-tissue relevance inference. These methods make use of different genomic information that include functional annotation information, expression quantitative trait loci information, genetically regulated gene expression information, as well as gene co-expression network information. These methods also use different statistical models that range from linear mixed models to covariance network models. We hope that this review can serve as a useful reference both for methodologists who develop methods and for applied analysts who apply these methods for identifying trait relevant tissues and cell types.

     
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  2. Robinson, Peter (Ed.)
    Abstract Motivation

    Identifying cis-acting genetic variants associated with gene expression levels—an analysis commonly referred to as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) mapping—is an important first step toward understanding the genetic determinant of gene expression variation. Successful eQTL mapping requires effective control of confounding factors. A common method for confounding effects control in eQTL mapping studies is the probabilistic estimation of expression residual (PEER) analysis. PEER analysis extracts PEER factors to serve as surrogates for confounding factors, which is further included in the subsequent eQTL mapping analysis. However, it is computationally challenging to determine the optimal number of PEER factors used for eQTL mapping. In particular, the standard approach to determine the optimal number of PEER factors examines one number at a time and chooses a number that optimizes eQTLs discovery. Unfortunately, this standard approach involves multiple repetitive eQTL mapping procedures that are computationally expensive, restricting its use in large-scale eQTL mapping studies that being collected today.

    Results

    Here, we present a simple and computationally scalable alternative, Effect size Correlation for COnfounding determination (ECCO), to determine the optimal number of PEER factors used for eQTL mapping studies. Instead of performing repetitive eQTL mapping, ECCO jointly applies differential expression analysis and Mendelian randomization analysis, leading to substantial computational savings. In simulations and real data applications, we show that ECCO identifies a similar number of PEER factors required for eQTL mapping analysis as the standard approach but is two orders of magnitude faster. The computational scalability of ECCO allows for optimized eQTL discovery across 48 GTEx tissues for the first time, yielding an overall 5.89% power gain on the number of eQTL harboring genes (eGenes) discovered as compared to the previous GTEx recommendation that does not attempt to determine tissue-specific optimal number of PEER factors.

    Availabilityand implementation

    Our method is implemented in the ECCO software, which, along with its GTEx mapping results, is freely available at www.xzlab.org/software.html. All R scripts used in this study are also available at this site.

    Supplementary information

    Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

     
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  3. Background

    Genome‐wide association studies (GWASs) have identified thousands of genetic variants that are associated with many complex traits. However, their biological mechanisms remain largely unknown. Transcriptome‐wide association studies (TWAS) have been recently proposed as an invaluable tool for investigating the potential gene regulatory mechanisms underlying variant‐trait associations. Specifically, TWAS integrate GWAS with expression mapping studies based on a common set of variants and aim to identify genes whose GReX is associated with the phenotype. Various methods have been developed for performing TWAS and/or similar integrative analysis. Each such method has a different modeling assumption and many were initially developed to answer different biological questions. Consequently, it is not straightforward to understand their modeling property from a theoretical perspective.

    Results

    We present a technical review on thirteen TWAS methods. Importantly, we show that these methods can all be viewed as two‐sample Mendelian randomization (MR) analysis, which has been widely applied in GWASs for examining the causal effects of exposure on outcome. Viewing different TWAS methods from an MR perspective provides us a unique angle for understanding their benefits and pitfalls. We systematically introduce the MR analysis framework, explain how features of the GWAS and expression data influence the adaptation of MR for TWAS, and re‐interpret the modeling assumptions made in different TWAS methods from an MR angle. We finally describe future directions for TWAS methodology development.

    Conclusions

    We hope that this review would serve as a useful reference for both methodologists who develop TWAS methods and practitioners who perform TWAS analysis.

     
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  4. Abstract

    Integrating results from genome-wide association studies (GWASs) and gene expression studies through transcriptome-wide association study (TWAS) has the potential to shed light on the causal molecular mechanisms underlying disease etiology. Here, we present a probabilistic Mendelian randomization (MR) method, PMR-Egger, for TWAS applications. PMR-Egger relies on a MR likelihood framework that unifies many existing TWAS and MR methods, accommodates multiple correlated instruments, tests the causal effect of gene on trait in the presence of horizontal pleiotropy, and is scalable to hundreds of thousands of individuals. In simulations, PMR-Egger provides calibrated type I error control for causal effect testing in the presence of horizontal pleiotropic effects, is reasonably robust under various types of model misspecifications, is more powerful than existing TWAS/MR approaches, and can directly test for horizontal pleiotropy. We illustrate the benefits of PMR-Egger in applications to 39 diseases and complex traits obtained from three GWASs including the UK Biobank.

     
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