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  1. What can humans compute in their heads? We are thinking of a variety of cryptographic protocols, games like sudoku, crossword puzzles, speed chess, and so on. For example, can a person compute a function in his or her head so that an eavesdropper with a powerful computer—who sees the responses to random inputs—still cannot infer responses to new inputs? To address such questions, we propose a rigorous model of human computation and associated measures of complexity. We apply the model and measures first and foremost to the problem of 1) humanly computable password generation and then, consider related problems of 2) humanly computable “one-way functions” and 3) humanly computable “pseudorandom generators.” The theory of human computability developed here plays by different rules than standard computability; the polynomial vs. exponential time divide of modern computability theory is irrelevant to human computation. In human computability, the step counts for both humans and computers must be more concrete. As an application and running example, password generation schemas are humanly computable algorithms based on private keys. Humanly computable and/or humanly usable mean, roughly speaking, that any human needing—and capable of using—passwords can if sufficiently motivated generate and memorize a secret key in less thanmore »1 h (including all rehearsals) and can subsequently use schema plus key to transform website names (challenges) into passwords (responses) in less than 1 min. Moreover, the schemas have precisely defined measures of security against all adversaries, human and/or machine.

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  2. Our expanding understanding of the brain at the level of neurons and synapses, and the level of cognitive phenomena such as language, leaves a formidable gap between these two scales. Here we introduce a computational system which promises to bridge this gap: the Assembly Calculus. It encompasses operations on assemblies of neurons, such as project, associate, and merge, which appear to be implicated in cognitive phenomena, and can be shown, analytically as well as through simulations, to be plausibly realizable at the level of neurons and synapses. We demonstrate the reach of this system by proposing a brain architecture for syntactic processing in the production of language, compatible with recent experimental results.
  3. We consider the communication complexity of a number of distributed optimization problems. We start with the problem of solving a linear system. Suppose there is a coordinator together with s servers P1, …, Ps, the i-th of which holds a subset A(i) x = b(i) of ni constraints of a linear system in d variables, and the coordinator would like to output an x ϵ ℝd for which A(i) x = b(i) for i = 1, …, s. We assume each coefficient of each constraint is specified using L bits. We first resolve the randomized and deterministic communication complexity in the point-to-point model of communication, showing it is (d2 L + sd) and (sd2L), respectively. We obtain similar results for the blackboard communication model. As a result of independent interest, we show the probability a random matrix with integer entries in {–2L, …, 2L} is invertible is 1–2−Θ(dL), whereas previously only 1 – 2−Θ(d) was known. When there is no solution to the linear system, a natural alternative is to find the solution minimizing the ℓp loss, which is the ℓp regression problem. While this problem has been studied, we give improved upper or lower bounds for every value ofmore »p ≥ 1. One takeaway message is that sampling and sketching techniques, which are commonly used in earlier work on distributed optimization, are neither optimal in the dependence on d nor on the dependence on the approximation ε, thus motivating new techniques from optimization to solve these problems. Towards this end, we consider the communication complexity of optimization tasks which generalize linear systems, such as linear, semi-definite, and convex programming. For linear programming, we first resolve the communication complexity when d is constant, showing it is (sL) in the point-to-point model. For general d and in the point-to-point model, we show an Õ(sd3L) upper bound and an (d2 L + sd) lower bound. In fact, we show if one perturbs the coefficients randomly by numbers as small as 2−Θ(L), then the upper bound is Õ(sd2L) + poly(dL), and so this bound holds for almost all linear programs. Our study motivates understanding the bit complexity of linear programming, which is related to the running time in the unit cost RAM model with words of O(log(nd)) bits, and we give the fastest known algorithms for linear programming in this model. Read More: https://epubs.siam.org/doi/10.1137/1.9781611975994.106« less
  4. Dimensionality reduction is a classical technique widely used for data analysis. One foundational instantiation is Principal Component Analysis (PCA), which minimizes the average reconstruction error. In this paper, we introduce the multi-criteria dimensionality reduction problem where we are given multiple objectives that need to be optimized simultaneously. As an application, our model captures several fairness criteria for dimensionality reduction such as the Fair-PCA problem introduced by Samadi et al. [NeurIPS18] and the Nash Social Welfare (NSW) problem. In the Fair-PCA problem, the input data is divided into k groups, and the goal is to find a single d-dimensional representation for all groups for which the maximum reconstruction error of any one group is minimized. In NSW the goal is to maximize the product of the individual variances of the groups achieved by the common low-dimensinal space.

    Our main result is an exact polynomial-time algorithm for the two-criteria dimensionality reduction problem when the two criteria are increasing concave functions. As an application of this result, we obtain a polynomial time algorithm for Fair-PCA for k=2 groups, resolving an open problem of Samadi et al.[NeurIPS18], and a polynomial time algorithm for NSW objective for k=2 groups. We also give approximation algorithms formore »k>2. Our technical contribution in the above results is to prove new low-rank properties of extreme point solutions to semi-definite programs. We conclude with the results of several experiments indicating improved performance and generalized application of our algorithm on real-world datasets.« less