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  1. ABSTRACT

    We investigate the case for environmental quenching of the Fornax-mass satellite DDO 113, which lies only 9 kpc in projection from its host, the Large-Magellanic-Cloud-mass galaxy NGC 4214. DDO 113 was quenched about 1 Gyr ago and is virtually gas-free, while analogs in the field are predominantly star-forming and gas-rich. We use deep imaging obtained with the Large Binocular Telescope to show that DDO 113 exhibits no evidence of tidal disruption to a surface brightness of μV ∼ 29 mag arcsec−2, based on both unresolved emission and resolved stars. Mass-analogs of DDO 113 in Illustris-1 with similar hosts, small projected separations,more »and no significant tidal stripping first fell into their host halo 2–6 Gyr ago, showing that tidal features (or lack thereof) can be used to constrain infall times in systems where there are few other constraints on the orbit of the satellite. With the infall time setting the clock for environmental quenching mechanisms, we investigate the plausibility of several such mechanisms. We find that strangulation, the cessation of cold gas inflows, is likely the dominant quenching mechanism for DDO 113, requiring a time-averaged mass-loading factor of η = 6–11 for star-formation-driven outflows that is consistent with theoretical and observational constraints. Motivated by recent numerical work, we connect DDO 113’s strangulation to the presence of a cool circumgalactic medium (CGM) around NGC 4214. This discovery shows that the CGM of low-mass galaxies can affect their satellites significantly and motivates further work on understanding the baryon cycle in low-mass galaxies.

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  2. ABSTRACT

    The All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN) provides long baseline (∼4 yr) light curves for sources brighter than V ≲ 17 mag across the whole sky. As part of our effort to characterize the variability of all the stellar sources visible in ASAS-SN, we have produced ∼30.1 million V-band light curves for sources in the Southern hemisphere using the APASS DR9 (AAVSO Photometric All-Sky Survey Data Release) catalogue as our input source list. We have systematically searched these sources for variability using a pipeline based on random forest classifiers. We have identified ${\sim } 220\, 000$ variables, including ${\sim }more »88\, 300$ new discoveries. In particular, we have discovered ${\sim }48\, 000$ red pulsating variables, ${\sim }23\, 000$ eclipsing binaries, ∼2200 δ-Scuti variables, and ${\sim }10\, 200$ rotational variables. The light curves and characteristics of the variables are all available through the ASAS-SN variable stars data base (https://asas-sn.osu.edu/variables). The pre-computed ASAS-SN V-band light curves for all the ∼30.1 million sources are available through the ASAS-SN photometry data base (https://asas-sn.osu.edu/photometry). This effort will be extended to provide ASAS-SN light curves for sources in the Northern hemisphere and for V ≲ 17 mag sources across the whole sky that are not included in APASS DR9.

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  3. Abstract We present observations of the extremely luminous but ambiguous nuclear transient (ANT) ASASSN-17jz, spanning roughly 1200 days of the object’s evolution. ASASSN-17jz was discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN) in the galaxy SDSS J171955.84+414049.4 on UT 2017 July 27 at a redshift of z = 0.1641. The transient peaked at an absolute B -band magnitude of M B ,peak = −22.81, corresponding to a bolometric luminosity of L bol,peak = 8.3 × 10 44 erg s −1 , and exhibited late-time ultraviolet emission that was still ongoing in our latest observations. Integrating the full light curvemore »gives a total emitted energy of E tot = (1.36 ±0.08) × 10 52 erg, with (0.80 ± 0.02) × 10 52 erg of this emitted within 200 days of peak light. This late-time ultraviolet emission is accompanied by increasing X-ray emission that becomes softer as it brightens. ASASSN-17jz exhibited a large number of spectral emission lines most commonly seen in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with little evidence of evolution. It also showed transient Balmer features, which became fainter and broader over time, and are still being detected >1000 days after peak brightness. We consider various physical scenarios for the origin of the transient, including supernovae (SNe), tidal disruption events, AGN outbursts, and ANTs. We find that the most likely explanation is that ASASSN-17jz was a SN IIn occurring in or near the disk of an existing AGN, and that the late-time emission is caused by the AGN transitioning to a more active state.« less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available July 1, 2023
  4. ABSTRACT As part of an All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN) search for sources with large flux decrements, we discovered a transient where the quiescent, stellar source ASASSN-V J192114.84+624950.8 rapidly decreased in flux by $\sim 55{{\ \rm per\ cent}}$ (∼0.9 mag) in the g band. The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite light curve revealed that the source is a highly eccentric, eclipsing binary. Fits to the light curve using phoebe find the binary orbit to have e = 0.79, Porb = 18.462 d, and i = 88.6°, and the ratios of the stellar radii and temperatures to be R2/R1 = 0.71 and Te,2/Te,1 = 0.82. Both starsmore »are chromospherically active, allowing us to determine their rotational periods of P1 = 1.52 d and P2 = 1.79 d, respectively. A Large Binocular Telescope/Multi-Object Double Spectrograph spectrum shows that the primary is a late-G- or early-K-type dwarf. Fits to the spectral energy distribution show that the luminosities and temperatures of the two stars are L1 = 0.48 L⊙, $T_1= 5050\, \mathrm{K}$, L2 = 0.12 L⊙, and $T_{2} = 4190\, \mathrm{K}$. We conclude that ASASSN-V J192114.84+624950.8 consists of two chromospherically active, rotational variable stars in a highly elliptical eclipsing orbit.« less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available June 2, 2023
  5. Abstract Low luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGN) probe accretion physics in the low Eddington regime can provide additional clues about galaxy evolution. AGN variability is ubiquitous and thus provides a reliable tool for finding AGN. We analyze the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae light curves of 1218 galaxies with g < 14 mag and Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra in search of AGN. We find 37 objects that are both variable and have AGN-like structure functions, which is about 3% of the sample. The majority of the variability selected AGN are LLAGN with Eddington ratios ranging from 10 −4 tomore »10 −2 . We thus estimate the fraction of LLAGN in the population of galaxies as 2% down to a median Eddington ratio of 2 × 10 −3 . Combining the BPT line ratio AGN diagnostics and the broad-line AGN, up to ∼60% of the AGN candidates are confirmed spectroscopically. The BPT diagnostics also classified 10%–30% of the candidates as star-forming galaxies rather than AGN.« less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available May 1, 2023
  6. ABSTRACT We introduce a new model for understanding AGN continuum variability. We start from a Shakura–Sunyaev thin accretion disc with a steady-state radial temperature profile T(R) and assume that the variable flux is due to axisymmetric temperature perturbations δT(R, t). After linearizing the equations, we fit UV–optical AGN light curves to determine δT(R, t) for a sample of seven AGNs. We see a diversity of |δT/T| ∼ 0.1 fluctuation patterns which are not dominated by outgoing waves travelling at the speed of light as expected for the ‘lamppost’ model used to interpret disc reverberation mapping studies. Rather, the most common pattern resemblesmore »slow (v ≪ c) ingoing waves. An explanation for our findings is that these ingoing waves trigger central temperature fluctuations that act as a lamppost, producing lower amplitude temperature fluctuations moving outwards at the speed of light. The light curves are dominated by the lamppost signal – even though the temperature fluctuations are dominated by other structures with similar variability time-scales – because the discs exponentially smooth the contributions from the slower moving (v ≪ c) fluctuations to the observed light curves. This leads to light curves that closely resemble the expectations for a lamppost model but with the slow variability time-scales of the ingoing waves. This also implies that longer time-scale variability signals will increasingly diverge from lamppost models because the smoothing of slower moving waves steadily decreases as their period or spatial wavelength increases.« less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available April 27, 2023
  7. Abstract In recent years, many Type IIn supernovae have been found to share striking similarities with the peculiar SN 2009ip, whose true nature is still under debate. Here, we present 10 yr of observations of SN 2011fh, an interacting transient with spectroscopic and photometric similarities to SN 2009ip. SN 2011fh had an M r ∼ −16 mag brightening event, followed by a brighter M r ∼ −18 mag luminous outburst in 2011 August. The spectra of SN 2011fh are dominated by narrow to intermediate Balmer emission lines throughout its evolution, with P Cygni profiles indicating fast-moving material at ∼6400 kmmore »s −1 . HST/WFC3 observations from 2016 October revealed a bright source with M F814W ≈ −13.3 mag, indicating that we are seeing the ongoing interaction of the ejecta with the circumstellar material or that the star might be going through an eruptive phase five years after the luminous outburst of 2011. Using HST photometry of the stellar cluster around SN 2011fh, we estimated an age of ∼4.5 Myr for the progenitor, which implies a stellar mass of ∼60 M ⊙ , using single-star evolution models, or a mass range of 35–80 M ⊙ , considering a binary system. We also show that the progenitor of SN 2011fh exceeded the classical Eddington limit by a large factor in the months preceding the luminous outburst of 2011, suggesting strong super-Eddington winds as a possible mechanism for the observed mass loss. These findings favor an energetic outburst in a young and massive star, possibly a luminous blue variable.« less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available April 1, 2023
  8. Abstract The CNIa0.02 project aims to collect a complete, nearby sample of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) light curves, and the SNe are volume-limited with host-galaxy redshifts z host < 0.02. The main scientific goal is to infer the distributions of key properties (e.g., the luminosity function) of local SNe Ia in a complete and unbiased fashion in order to study SN explosion physics. We spectroscopically classify any SN candidate detected by the All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN) that reaches a peak brightness <16.5 mag. Since ASAS-SN scans the full sky and does not target specific galaxies, our targetmore »selection is effectively unbiased by host-galaxy properties. We perform multiband photometric observations starting from the time of discovery. In the first data release (DR1), we present the optical light curves obtained for 247 SNe from our project (including 148 SNe in the complete sample), and we derive parameters such as the peak fluxes, Δ m 15 , and s BV .« less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available March 30, 2023
  9. ABSTRACT With Gaia parallaxes, it is possible to study the stellar populations associated with individual Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs) to estimate the mass of the exploding star. Here, we analyse the luminous stars near the Vela pulsar and SNR to find that its progenitor was probably ($\mathrel {\raise.3ex\rm{\gt }\lower0.6ex\rm{\sim }}90\rm \,per\,cent$) low mass (8.1–$10.3\, {\rm M}_\odot$). The presence of the O star γ2 Vel a little over 100 pc from Vela is the primary ambiguity, as including it in the analysis volume significantly increases the probability (to 5 per cent) of higher mass ($\gt 20\, {\rm M}_\odot$) progenitors. However, to be a high-mass starmore »associated with γ2 Vel’s star cluster at birth, the progenitor would have to be a runaway star from an unbound binary with an unusually high velocity. The primary impediment to analysing large numbers of Galactic SNRs in this manner is the lack of accurate distances. This can likely be solved by searching for absorption lines from the SNR in stars as a function of distance, a method which yielded a distance to Vela in agreement with the direct pulsar parallax. If Vela was a $10\, {\rm M}_\odot$ supernova in an external galaxy, the 50-pc search region used in extragalactic studies would contain only $\simeq 10\rm \,per\,cent$ of the stars formed in a 50-pc region around the progenitor at birth and $\simeq 90\rm \,per\,cent$ of the stars in the search region would have been born elsewhere.« less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available February 21, 2023
  10. Abstract We present the first results from Citizen ASAS-SN, a citizen science project for the All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN) hosted on the Zooniverse platform. Citizen ASAS-SN utilizes the newer, deeper, higher cadence ASAS-SN g -band data and tasks volunteers to classify periodic variable star candidates based on their phased light curves. We started from 40,640 new variable candidates from an input list of ∼7.4 million stars with δ < −60° and the volunteers identified 10,420 new discoveries which they classified as 4234 pulsating variables, 3132 rotational variables, 2923 eclipsing binaries, and 131 variables flagged as Unknown. They classifiedmore »known variable stars with an accuracy of 89% for pulsating variables, 81% for eclipsing binaries, and 49% for rotational variables. We examine user performance, agreement between users, and compare the citizen science classifications with our machine learning classifier updated for the g -band light curves. In general, user activity correlates with higher classification accuracy and higher user agreement. We used the user’s “Junk” classifications to develop an effective machine learning classifier to separate real from false variables, and there is a clear path for using this “Junk” training set to significantly improve our primary machine learning classifier. We also illustrate the value of Citizen ASAS-SN for identifying unusual variables with several examples.« less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available February 1, 2023