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  1. In the k -cut problem, we want to find the lowest-weight set of edges whose deletion breaks a given (multi)graph into k connected components. Algorithms of Karger and Stein can solve this in roughly O ( n 2k ) time. However, lower bounds from conjectures about the k -clique problem imply that Ω ( n (1- o (1)) k ) time is likely needed. Recent results of Gupta, Lee, and Li have given new algorithms for general k -cut in n 1.98k + O(1) time, as well as specialized algorithms with better performance for certain classes of graphs (e.g., for small integer edge weights). In this work, we resolve the problem for general graphs. We show that the Contraction Algorithm of Karger outputs any fixed k -cut of weight α λ k with probability Ω k ( n - α k ), where λ k denotes the minimum k -cut weight. This also gives an extremal bound of O k ( n k ) on the number of minimum k -cuts and an algorithm to compute λ k with roughly n k polylog( n ) runtime. Both are tight up to lower-order factors, with the algorithmic lower bound assuming hardness of max-weight k -clique. The first main ingredient in our result is an extremal bound on the number of cuts of weight less than 2 λ k / k , using the Sunflower lemma. The second ingredient is a fine-grained analysis of how the graph shrinks—and how the average degree evolves—in the Karger process. 
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  2. Braverman, Mark (Ed.)
    We develop approximation algorithms for set-selection problems with deterministic constraints, but random objective values, i.e., stochastic probing problems. When the goal is to maximize the objective, approximation algorithms for probing problems are well-studied. On the other hand, few techniques are known for minimizing the objective, especially in the adaptive setting, where information about the random objective is revealed during the set-selection process and allowed to influence it. For minimization problems in particular, incorporating adaptivity can have a considerable effect on performance. In this work, we seek approximation algorithms that compare well to the optimal adaptive policy. We develop new techniques for adaptive minimization, applying them to a few problems of interest. The core technique we develop here is an approximate reduction from an adaptive expectation minimization problem to a set of adaptive probability minimization problems which we call threshold problems. By providing near-optimal solutions to these threshold problems, we obtain bicriteria adaptive policies. We apply this method to obtain an adaptive approximation algorithm for the Min-Element problem, where the goal is to adaptively pick random variables to minimize the expected minimum value seen among them, subject to a knapsack constraint. This partially resolves an open problem raised in [Goel et al., 2010]. We further consider three extensions on the Min-Element problem, where our objective is the sum of the smallest k element-weights, or the weight of the min-weight basis of a given matroid, or where the constraint is not given by a knapsack but by a matroid constraint. For all three of the variations we explore, we develop adaptive approximation algorithms for their corresponding threshold problems, and prove their near-optimality via coupling arguments. 
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  3. Naor, Joseph ; Buchbinder, Niv (Ed.)
  4. Naor, Joseph ; Buchbinder, Niv (Ed.)
  5. Naor, Joseph ; Buchbinder, Niv (Ed.)
  6. We study the problem of chasing convex bodies online: given a sequence of convex bodies the algorithm must respond with points in an online fashion (i.e., is chosen before is revealed). The objective is to minimize the sum of distances between successive points in this sequence. Bubeck et al. (STOC 2019) gave a -competitive algorithm for this problem. We give an algorithm that is -competitive for any sequence of length . 
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  7. Wootters, Mary and (Ed.)
    We consider online scheduling to minimize weighted completion time on related machines, where each job consists of several tasks that can be concurrently executed. A job gets completed when all its component tasks finish. We obtain an O(K³ log² K)-competitive algorithm in the non-clairvoyant setting, where K denotes the number of distinct machine speeds. The analysis is based on dual-fitting on a precedence-constrained LP relaxation that may be of independent interest. 
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