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  1. Free, publicly-accessible full text available January 1, 2023
  2. Free, publicly-accessible full text available January 1, 2023
  3. Mitrovic, Antonija ; Bosch, Nigel (Ed.)
    As online learning platforms become more ubiquitous throughout various curricula, there is a growing need to evaluate the effectiveness of these platforms and the different methods used to structure online education and tutoring. Towards this endeavor, some platforms have performed randomized controlled experiments to compare different user experiences, curriculum structures, and tutoring strategies in order to ensure the effectiveness of their platform and personalize the education of the students using it. These experiments are typically analyzed on an individual basis in order to reveal insights on a specific aspect of students' online educational experience. In this work, the data from 50,752 instances of 30,408 students participating in 50 different experiments conducted at scale within the online learning platform ASSISTments were aggregated and analyzed for consistent trends across experiments. By combining common experimental conditions and normalizing the dependent measures between experiments, this work has identified multiple statistically significant insights on the impact of various skill mastery requirements, strategies for personalization, and methods for tutoring in an online setting. This work can help direct further experimentation and inform the design and improvement of new and existing online learning platforms. The anonymized data compiled for this work are hosted by the Open Sciencemore »Foundation and can be found at https://osf.io/59shv/.« less
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available January 1, 2023
  4. Free, publicly-accessible full text available January 1, 2023
  5. Free, publicly-accessible full text available January 1, 2023
  6. A s m or e e d u c at or s i nt e gr at e t h eir c urri c ul a wit h o nli n e l e ar ni n g, it i s e a si er t o cr o w d s o ur c e c o nt e nt fr o m t h e m. Cr o w ds o ur c e d t ut ori n g h a s b e e n pr o v e n t o r eli a bl y i n cr e a s e st u d e nt s’ n e xt pr o bl e m c orr e ct n e s s. I n t hi s w or k, w e c o n fir m e d t h e fi n di n g s of a pr e vi o u s st u d y i n t hi s ar e a, wit h str o n g er c o n fi d e n c e m ar gi n s t h amore »n pr e vi o u sl y, a n d r e v e al e d t h at o nl y a p orti o n of cr o w d s o ur c e d c o nt e nt cr e at or s h a d a r eli a bl e b e n e fit t o st ud e nt s. F urt h er m or e, t hi s w or k pr o vi d e s a m et h o d t o r a n k c o nt e nt cr e at or s r el ati v e t o e a c h ot h er, w hi c h w a s u s e d t o d et er mi n e w hi c h c o nt e nt cr e at or s w er e m o st eff e cti v e o v er all, a n d w hi c h c o nt e nt cr e at or s w er e m o st eff e cti v e f or s p e ci fi c gr o u p s of st u d e nt s. W h e n e x pl ori n g d at a fr o m Te a c h er A SSI S T, a f e at ur e wit hi n t h e A S SI S T m e nt s l e ar ni n g pl atf or m t h at cr o w d s o ur c e s t ut ori n g fr o m t e a c h er s, w e f o u n d t h at w hil e o v erall t hi s pr o gr a m pr o vi d e s a b e n e fit t o st u d e nt s, s o m e t e a c h er s cr e at e d m or e eff e cti v e c o nt e nt t h a n ot h er s. D e s pit e t hi s fi n di n g, w e di d n ot fi n d e vi d e n c e t h at t h e eff e cti v e n e s s of c o nt e nt r eli a bl y v ari e d b y st u d e nt k n o wl e d g e-l e v el, s u g g e sti n g t h at t h e c o nt e nt i s u nli k el y s uit a bl e f or p er s o n ali zi n g i n str u cti o n b a s e d o n st u d e nt k n o wl e d g e al o n e. T h e s e fi n di n g s ar e pr o mi si n g f or t h e f ut ur e of cr o w d s o ur c e d t ut ori n g a s t h e y h el p pr o vi d e a f o u n d ati o n f or a s s e s si n g t h e q u alit y of cr o w d s o ur c e d c o nt e nt a n d i n v e sti g ati n g c o nt e nt f or o p p ort u niti e s t o p er s o n ali z e st u d e nt s’ e d u c ati o n.« less
  7. Roll, I. ; McNamara, D. ; Sosnovsky, S. ; Luckin, R. ; Dimitrova, V. (Ed.)
    Scaffolding and providing feedback on problem-solving activities during online learning has consistently been shown to improve performance in younger learners. However, less is known about the impacts of feedback strategies on adult learners. This paper investigates how two computer-based support strategies, hints and required scaffolding questions, contribute to performance and behavior in an edX MOOC with integrated assignments from ASSISTments, a web-based platform that implements diverse student supports. Results from a sample of 188 adult learners indicated that those given scaffolds benefited less from ASSISTments support and were more likely to request the correct answer from the system.
  8. Similar content has tremendous utility in classroom and online learning environments. For example, similar content can be used to combat cheating, track students’ learning over time, and model students’ latent knowledge. These different use cases for similar content all rely on different notions of similarity, which make it difficult to determine contents’ similarities. Crowdsourcing is an effective way to identify similar content in a variety of situations by providing workers with guidelines on how to identify similar content for a particular use case. However, crowdsourced opinions are rarely homogeneous and therefore must be aggregated into what is most likely the truth. This work presents the Dynamically Weighted Majority Vote method. A novel algorithm that combines aggregating workers’ crowdsourced opinions with estimating the reliability of each worker. This method was compared to the traditional majority vote method in both a simulation study and an empirical study, in which opinions on seventh grade mathematics problems’ similarity were crowdsourced from middle school math teachers and college students. In both the simulation and the empirical study the Dynamically Weighted Majority Vote method outperformed the traditional majority vote method, suggesting that this method should be used instead of majority vote in future crowdsourcing endeavors.