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  1. Autonomous Mobile Robots (AMRs) rely on rechargeable batteries to execute several objective tasks during navigation. Previous research has focused on minimizing task downtime by coordinating task allocation and/or charge scheduling across multiple AMRs. However, they do not jointly ensure low task downtime and high-quality battery life.In this paper, we present TCM, a Task allocation and Charging Manager for AMR fleets. TCM allocates objective tasks to AMRs and schedules their charging times at the available charging stations for minimized task downtime and maximized AMR batteries’ quality of life. We formulate the TCM problem as an MINLP problem and propose a polynomial-time multi-period TCM greedy algorithm that periodically adapts its decisions for high robustness to energy modeling errors. We experimentally show that, compared to the MINLP implementation in Gurobi solver, the designed algorithm provides solutions with a performance ratio of 1.15 at a fraction of the execution time. Furthermore, compared to representative baselines that only focus on task downtime, TCM achieves similar task allocation results while providing much higher battery quality of life.
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available January 1, 2023
  2. In Vehicular Edge Computing (VEC) systems, the computing resources of connected Electric Vehicles (EV) are used to fulfill the low-latency computation requirements of vehicles. However, local execution of heavy workloads may drain a considerable amount of energy in EVs. One promising way to improve the energy efficiency is to share and coordinate computing resources among connected EVs. However, the uncertainties in the future location of vehicles make it hard to decide which vehicles participate in resource sharing and how long they share their resources so that all participants benefit from resource sharing. In this paper, we propose VECMAN, a framework for energy-aware resource management in VEC systems composed of two algorithms: (i) a resource selector algorithm that determines the participating vehicles and the duration of resource sharing period; and (ii) an energy manager algorithm that manages computing resources of the participating vehicles with the aim of minimizing the computational energy consumption. We evaluate the proposed algorithms and show that they considerably reduce the vehicles computational energy consumption compared to the state-of-the-art baselines. Specifically, our algorithms achieve between 7% and 18% energy savings compared to a baseline that executes workload locally and an average of 13% energy savings compared to amore »baseline that offloads vehicles workloads to RSUs.« less