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  1. The University of Alaska Fairbanks T Field is a legacy farm field that is part of the National Science Foundation (NSF) Funded Permafrost Grown project. We are studying the long-term effects of permafrost thaw following initial clearing for cultivation purposes. In this regard, we have acquired very high resolution light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data and digital photography from a DJI M300 drone using a Zenmuse L1 and a MicaSense RedEdge-P camera. The Zenmuse L1 integrates a Livox Lidar module, a high-accuracy inertial measurement units (IMU), and a camera with a 1-inch CMOS on a 3-axis stabilized gimbal. The MicaSense RedEdge-P camera has five multispectral bands and a high-resolution panchromatic band. The drone was configured to fly in real-time kinematic (RTK) mode at an altitude of 60 meters above ground level using the DJI D-RTK 2 base station. Data was acquired using a 50% sidelap and a 70% frontlap for the Zenmuse L1 and an 80% sidelap and a 75% frontlap for the MicaSense. Additional ground control was established with a Leica GS18 global navigation satellite system (GNSS) and all data have been post-processed to World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS84) universal transverse mercator (UTM) Zone 6 North using ellipsoid heights. Data outputs include a two-class-classified LiDAR point cloud, digital surface model, digital terrain model, an orthophoto mosaic, and a multispectral orthoimage consisting of five bands. Image acquisition occurred on 18 August 2023. 
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  2. The Permafrost Grown project (NSF RISE Award # 2126965) is co-producing knowledge with farmers in Alaska (Tanana Valley and Bethel) to investigate the interactions and feedbacks between permafrost and agriculture. Additional project objectives include understanding legacy effects over a 120-year cultivation history in the Tanana Valley, evaluating the socio-economic effects of permafrost-agriculture interactions and provide decision making tools for farmers and finally to utilize education and outreach activities to share knowledge with the farmers and the public. The project focuses on in-the-ground farming in a range of cultivation types including crops, peonies and livestock. The project is funded through the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Navigating the New Arctic Initiative. Data was collected at a small (less than one acre) farm that grows diverse crops. This farm has been impacted by subsidence from thawing ice-rich permafrost. The goal of the celery trials was to compare celery grown in areas that are wetter due to subsidence and celery grown in an upper area that has been less impacted by subsidence. In addition, over the same period, monitoring was done of two compost piles: one older pile that has been actively used and maintained for a few years that will no longer be maintained (i.e. adding of new material for decomposition) and the establishment of a new compost pile. The monitoring of the compost pile is part of a larger effort to determine the thermal impact of commonly used agricultural practices and the potential impact on permafrost. 
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  3. The Permafrost Grown project (NSF RISE Award # 2126965) is co-producing knowledge with farmers in Alaska (Tanana Valley and Bethel) to investigate the interactions and feedbacks between permafrost and agriculture. Additional project objectives include understanding legacy effects over a 120-year cultivation history in the Tanana Valley, evaluating the socio-economic effects of permafrost-agriculture interactions and provide decision making tools for farmers and finally to utilize education and outreach activities to share knowledge with the farmers and the public. The project focuses on in-the-ground farming in a range of cultivation types including crops, peonies and livestock. The project is funded through the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Navigating the New Arctic Initiative. Temperature monitoring of various crop types with and without extension techniques was done at two farm sites in Fairbanks, Alaska (AK) during the 2022 growing season. This work was done through the Permafrost Grown Project as part of an effort to determine the thermal impact of commonly used agricultural seasonal-extension techniques, crop types and their potential impact on permafrost. Both farms are small scale, each cultivating on about 1 acre and both grow diverse crops. Both farms use various season extension techniques, including the use of plastic mulch to artificially warm soils and/or help control weeds. This dataset provides monitoring of ground temperatures at four depths (ground surface, 15 centimeter (cm), 50 cm and 100 cm) of various crops (carrots, cabbage, beets, onions, and squash). 
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  4. The Midnight Sun Golf Course in Fairbanks, Alaska is a legacy farm field that is part of the National Science Foundation (NSF) Funded Permafrost Grown project. This 65 hectare (ha) parcel was initially cleared for agriculture purposes but changed land-use practices to a golf course around 25 years ago. The land-use conversion was in part due to ice-rich permafrost thaw following clearing. We are studying the long-term effects of permafrost thaw following initial clearing for cultivation purposes. We are working with the current landowners to provide information regarding ongoing thermokarst development on the property and to conduct studies in reforested portions of the land area to understand land clearing and reforestation on permafrost-affected soils. In this regard, we have acquired very high resolution light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data and digital photography from a DJI M300 drone using a Zenmuse L1. The Zenmuse L1 integrates a Livox Lidar module, a high-accuracy inertial measurement units (IMU), and a camera with a 1-inch CMOS on a 3-axis stabilized gimbal. The drone was configured to fly in real-time kinematic (RTK) mode at an altitude of 60 meters above ground level using the DJI D-RTK 2 base station. Data was acquired using a 50% sidelap and a 70% frontlap. Additional ground control was established with a Leica GS18 global navigation satellite system (GNSS) and all data have been post-processed to World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS84) universal transverse mercator (UTM) Zone 6 North using ellipsoid heights. Data outputs include a two-class classified LiDAR point cloud, digital surface model, digital terrain model, and an orthophoto mosaic. Image acquisition occurred on 10 September 2023. The input images are available for download at http://arcticdata.io/data/10.18739/A2PC2TB1T. 
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