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Title: The native South American crayfishes (Crustacea, Parastacidae): state of knowledge and conservation status: SOUTH AMERICAN CRAYFISHES, STATE OF KNOWLEDGE, CONSERVATION STATUS
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1301820
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10019782
Journal Name:
Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems
Volume:
25
Issue:
2
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
288 to 301
ISSN:
1052-7613
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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