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Title: Electrically coupling complex oxides to semiconductors: a route to novel material functionalities
Complex oxides and semiconductors exhibit distinct yet complementary properties owing to their respective ionic and covalent natures. By electrically coupling complex oxides to traditional semiconductors within epitaxial heterostructures, enhanced or novel functionalities beyond those of the constituent materials can potentially be realized. Essential to electrically coupling complex oxides to semiconductors is control of the physical structure of the epitaxially grown oxide, as well as the electronic structure of the interface. Here we discuss how composition of the perovskite A- and B- site cations can be manipulated to control the physical and electronic structure of semiconductor – complex oxide heterostructures. Two prototypical heterostructures, Ba1-xSrxTiO3/Ge and SrZrxTi1-xO3/Ge, will be discussed. In the case of Ba1-xSrxTiO3/Ge, we discuss how strain can be engineered through A-site composition to enable the re-orientable ferroelectric polarization of the former to be coupled to carriers in the semiconductor. In the case of SrZrxTi1-xO3/Ge we discuss how B-site composition can be exploited to control the band offset at the interface. Analogous to heterojunctions between compound semiconducting materials, control of band offsets, i.e. band-gap engineering, provide a pathway to electrically couple complex oxides to semiconductors to realize a host of functionalities.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1508530
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10024448
Journal Name:
Journal of materials research
Volume:
32
Issue:
2
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
249-259
ISSN:
1092-8928
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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