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Title: Assessing Broader Impacts
ABSTRACT The National Alliance for Broader Impacts (NABI) seeks to foster a community of practice that increases individual and institutional capacity for, and engagement in, broader impact (BI) activities and scholarship. NABI currently has 537 individual members representing more than 210 institutions and organizations who are part of the growing network of professionals. The National Science Foundation (NSF) evaluates all proposals on their intellectual merit and their broader impacts. Many investigators grapple with how to articulate and effectively engage broad audiences in materials science and STEM. Here, we describe the effort of NABI to address BI challenges, present the NABI document Broader Impacts, Guiding Principles and Questions for National Science Foundation Principal Investigators and Proposal Reviewers; highlight the impacts of NABI as a catalyst for building BI capacity; and provide an example of assessing an innovative program’s BI.
Authors:
;
Award ID(s):
1663296
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10028113
Journal Name:
MRS Advances
Volume:
2
Issue:
31-32
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1681 to 1686
ISSN:
2059-8521
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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