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Title: S-Nitrosothiols: chemistry and reactions
The formation of S -nitrosothiols (SNO) in protein cysteine residues is an important post-translational modification elicited by nitric oxide (NO). This process is involved in virtually every class of cell signaling and has attracted considerable attention in redox biology. On the other hand, their unique structural characters make SNO potentially useful synthons. In this review, we summarized the fundamental chemical/physical properties of SNO. We also highlighted the reported chemical reactions of SNO, including the reactions with phosphine reagents, sulfinic acids, various nucleophiles, SNO-mediated radical additions, and the reactions of acyl SNO species.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1738305
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10057355
Journal Name:
Chem. Commun.
Volume:
53
Issue:
82
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
11266 to 11277
ISSN:
1359-7345
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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