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Title: Sliver-Suppressing Tetrahedral Mesh Optimization with Gradient-Based Shape Matching Energy
In this paper, a novel shape matching energy is proposed to suppress slivers for tetrahedral mesh generation. Given a volumetric domain with a user-specified template (regular) simplex, the tetrahedral meshing problem is transformed into a shape matching formulation with a gradient-based energy, i.e., the gradient of linear shape function. It effectively inhibits small heights and suppresses all the badly-shaped tetrahedrons in tetrahedral meshes. The proposed approach iteratively optimizes vertex positions and mesh connectivity, and makes the simplices in the computed mesh as close as possible to the template simplex. We compare our results qualitatively and quantitatively with the state-of-the-art algorithm in tetrahedral meshing on extensive models using the standard measurement criteria.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1657364
NSF-PAR ID:
10058463
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Computer aided geometric design
Volume:
52-53
ISSN:
0167-8396
Page Range / eLocation ID:
247 - 261
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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