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Title: A LATERAL FLOW-THROUGH LABEL-FREE BIOSENSOR BASED ON SILICON PHOTONICS
The optical resonances of the silicon nanopost array patterned on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate have been investigated. The fabricated device supports optical resonances in the range of 1.55 μm with a variable Q factor depending on the angle of incidence. By sealing the device on top of the nanoposts, we demonstrated a lateral flow-through label-free biosensor built on SOI. The biosensor exhibits the refractive index sensitivity of 800 nm/RIU and the femtomolar sensitivity for detection of a breast cancer biomarker (ErbB2).
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1711839
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10062947
Journal Name:
21st International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences October 22-26, 2017, Savannah, Georgia, USA
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
565 - 566
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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