skip to main content

Title: From Ensemble Clustering to Multi-View Clustering

Multi-View Clustering (MVC) aims to find the cluster structure shared by multiple views of a particular dataset. Existing MVC methods mainly integrate the raw data from different views, while ignoring the high-level information. Thus, their performance may degrade due to the conflict between heterogeneous features and the noises existing in each individual view. To overcome this problem, we propose a novel Multi-View Ensemble Clustering (MVEC) framework to solve MVC in an Ensemble Clustering (EC) way, which generates Basic Partitions (BPs) for each view individually and seeks for a consensus partition among all the BPs. By this means, we naturally leverage the complementary information of multi-view data in the same partition space. Instead of directly fusing BPs, we employ the low-rank and sparse decomposition to explicitly consider the connection between different views and detect the noises in each view. Moreover, the spectral ensemble clustering task is also involved by our framework with a carefully designed constraint, making MVEC a unified optimization framework to achieve the final consensus partition. Experimental results on six real-world datasets show the efficacy of our approach compared with both MVC and EC methods.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1651902
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10064682
Journal Name:
IJCAI
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
2843 to 2849
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
More Like this
  1. Clustering is a machine learning paradigm of dividing sample subjects into a number of groups such that subjects in the same groups are more similar to those in other groups. With advances in information acquisition technologies, samples can frequently be viewed from different angles or in different modalities, generating multi-view data. Multi-view clustering, that clusters subjects into subgroups using multi-view data, has attracted more and more attentions. Although MVC methods have been developed rapidly, there has not been enough survey to summarize and analyze the current progress. Therefore, we propose a novel taxonomy of the MVC approaches. Similar with machine learning methods, we categorize them into generative and discriminative classes. In discriminative class, based on the way to integrate multiple views, we split it further into five groups: Common Eigenvector Matrix, Common Coefficient Matrix, Common Indicator Matrix, Direct Combination and Combination After Projection. Furthermore, we discuss the relationships between MVC and some related topics: multi-view representation, ensemble clustering, multi-task clustering, multi-view supervised and semi-supervised learning. Several representative real-world applications are elaborated for practitioners. Some commonly used multi-view datasets are introduced and several representative MVC algorithms from each group are run to conduct the comparison to analyze how and why theymore »perform on those datasets. To promote future development of MVC approaches, we point out several open problems that may require further investigation and thorough examination.« less
  2. Network embedding has demonstrated effective empirical performance for various network mining tasks such as node classification, link prediction, clustering, and anomaly detection. However, most of these algorithms focus on the single-view network scenario. From a real-world perspective, one individual node can have different connectivity patterns in different networks. For example, one user can have different relationships on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn due to varying user behaviors on different platforms. In this case, jointly considering the structural information from multiple platforms (i.e., multiple views) can potentially lead to more comprehensive node representations, and eliminate noises and bias from a single view. In this paper, we propose a view-adversarial framework to generate comprehensive and robust multi-view network representations named VANE, which is based on two adversarial games. The first adversarial game enhances the comprehensiveness of the node representation by discriminating the view information which is obtained from the subgraph induced by neighbors of that node. The second adversarial game improves the robustness of the node representation with the challenging of fake node representations from the generative adversarial net. We conduct extensive experiments on downstream tasks with real-world multi-view networks, which shows that our proposed VANE framework significantly outperforms other baseline methods.
  3. Ensemble clustering generally integrates basic partitions into a consensus one through a graph partitioning method, which, however, has two limitations: 1) it neglects to reuse original features; 2) obtaining consensus partition with learnable graph representations is still under-explored. In this paper, we propose a novel Adversarial Graph Auto-Encoders (AGAE) model to incorporate ensemble clustering into a deep graph embedding process. Specifically, graph convolutional network is adopted as probabilistic encoder to jointly integrate the information from feature content and consensus graph, and a simple inner product layer is used as decoder to reconstruct graph with the encoded latent variables (i.e., embedding representations). Moreover, we develop an adversarial regularizer to guide the network training with an adaptive partition-dependent prior. Experiments on eight real-world datasets are presented to show the effectiveness of AGAE over several state-of-the-art deep embedding and ensemble clustering methods.

  4. Data from many real-world applications can be naturally represented by multi-view networks where the different views encode different types of relationships (e.g., friendship, shared interests in music, etc.) between real-world individuals or entities. There is an urgent need for methods to obtain low-dimensional, information preserving and typically nonlinear embeddings of such multi-view networks. However, most of the work on multi-view learning focuses on data that lack a network structure, and most of the work on network embeddings has focused primarily on single-view networks. Against this background, we consider the multi-view network representation learning problem, i.e., the problem of constructing low-dimensional information preserving embeddings of multi-view networks. Specifically, we investigate a novel Generative Adversarial Network (GAN) framework for Multi-View Network Embedding, namely MEGAN, aimed at preserving the information from the individual network views, while accounting for connectivity across (and hence complementarity of and correlations between) different views. The results of our experiments on two real-world multi-view data sets show that the embeddings obtained using MEGAN outperform the state-of-the-art methods on node classification, link prediction and visualization tasks.

  5. Abstract Background

    In Alzheimer’s Diseases (AD) research, multimodal imaging analysis can unveil complementary information from multiple imaging modalities and further our understanding of the disease. One application is to discover disease subtypes using unsupervised clustering. However, existing clustering methods are often applied to input features directly, and could suffer from the curse of dimensionality with high-dimensional multimodal data. The purpose of our study is to identify multimodal imaging-driven subtypes in Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) participants using a multiview learning framework based on Deep Generalized Canonical Correlation Analysis (DGCCA), to learn shared latent representation with low dimensions from 3 neuroimaging modalities.

    Results

    DGCCA applies non-linear transformation to input views using neural networks and is able to learn correlated embeddings with low dimensions that capture more variance than its linear counterpart, generalized CCA (GCCA). We designed experiments to compare DGCCA embeddings with single modality features and GCCA embeddings by generating 2 subtypes from each feature set using unsupervised clustering. In our validation studies, we found that amyloid PET imaging has the most discriminative features compared with structural MRI and FDG PET which DGCCA learns from but not GCCA. DGCCA subtypes show differential measures in 5 cognitive assessments, 6 brain volume measures, and conversion to AD patterns. Inmore »addition, DGCCA MCI subtypes confirmed AD genetic markers with strong signals that existing late MCI group did not identify.

    Conclusion

    Overall, DGCCA is able to learn effective low dimensional embeddings from multimodal data by learning non-linear projections. MCI subtypes generated from DGCCA embeddings are different from existing early and late MCI groups and show most similarity with those identified by amyloid PET features. In our validation studies, DGCCA subtypes show distinct patterns in cognitive measures, brain volumes, and are able to identify AD genetic markers. These findings indicate the promise of the imaging-driven subtypes and their power in revealing disease structures beyond early and late stage MCI.

    « less