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Title: Adaptive Dynamic Programming for Decentralized Stabilization of Uncertain Nonlinear Large-Scale Systems With Mismatched Interconnections
This paper presents a novel decentralized control strategy for a class of uncertain nonlinear large-scale systems with mismatched interconnections. First, it is shown that the decentralized controller for the overall system can be represented by an array of optimal control policies of auxiliary subsystems. Then, within the framework of adaptive dynamic programming, a simultaneous policy iteration (SPI) algorithm is developed to solve the Hamilton–Jacobi–Bellman equations associated with auxiliary subsystem optimal control policies. The convergence of the SPI algorithm is guaranteed by an equivalence relationship. To implement the present SPI algorithm, actor and critic neural networks are applied to approximate the optimal control policies and the optimal value functions, respectively. Meanwhile, both the least squares method and the Monte Carlo integration technique are employed to derive the unknown weight parameters. Furthermore, by using Lyapunov’s direct method, the overall system with the obtained decentralized controller is proved to be asymptotically stable. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed decentralized control scheme is illustrated via simulations for nonlinear plants and unstable power systems.
Authors:
;
Award ID(s):
1731672
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10065579
Journal Name:
IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics: Systems
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1 to 13
ISSN:
2168-2216
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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