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Title: scanning frequency comb microscopy: a new method in scanning probe microscopy
Finer resolution with greater stability is possible using unique low-power (aW), low-noise (20 dB S/N), microwave harmonics generated within a nanoscale tip-sample junction for feedback control in place of the DC tunneling current. Please see the attached poster to be presented at the Microscopy & Microanalysis-2018 meeting in Baltimore Monday August 6th as Post-deadline poster PDP-18. Applications include true sub-nm resolution in the carrier profiling of semiconductors. This method is especially appropriate for resistive samples where the spreading resistance flattens plots of the tunneling current vs. tip-sample distance with a scanning tunneling microscope.
Authors:
Award ID(s):
1648811
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10066863
Journal Name:
scanning frequency comb microscopy: a new method in scanning probe microscopy
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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