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Title: Guidelines on Successfully Porting Non-Immersive Games to Virtual Reality: A Case Study in Minecraft
Virtual reality games have grown rapidly in popularity since the first consumer VR head-mounted displays were released in 2016, however comparatively little research has explored how this new medium impacts the experience of players. In this paper, we present a study exploring how user experience changes when playing Minecraft on the desktop and in immersive virtual reality. Fourteen players completed six 45 minute sessions, three played on the desktop and three in VR. The Gaming Experience Questionnaire, the i-Group presence questionnaire, and the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire were administered after each session, and players were interviewed at the end of the experiment. Participants strongly preferred playing Minecraft in VR, despite frustrations with using teleporation as a travel technique and feelings of simulator sickness. Players enjoyed using motion controls, but still continued to use indirect input under certain circumstances. This did not appear to negatively impact feelings of presence. We conclude with four lessons for game developers interested in porting their games to virtual reality.
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1717937
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10067549
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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