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Title: Inferring users' choice functions in networked social systems through active queries
Using synchronous dynamical systems (SyDSs) as a formal model for networked social systems, we study the problem of inferring users’ choices in such systems. We observe that SyDSs with deterministic and probabilistic threshold functions as local functions can capture users’ choices in the context of contagion propagation in social networks. We use an active query mechanism where a user interacts with a system by submitting queries, and the responses to the queries are used to infer the local functions. We develop methods that provide provably efficient query sets for inferring both deterministic and probabilistic forms of threshold functions. We also present experimental results using real world social networks.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1633028
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10067758
Journal Name:
The 7th International Workshop on Computational Social Choice (COMSOC-2018)
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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