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Title: Monotone circuit lower bounds from resolution
We introduce a new technique for reducing the dimension of the ambient space of low-degree polynomials in the Gaussian space while preserving their relative correlation structure. As an application, we obtain an explicit upper bound on the dimension of an epsilon-optimal noise-stable Gaussian partition. In fact, we address the more general problem of upper bounding the number of samples needed to epsilon-approximate any joint distribution that can be non-interactively simulated from a correlated Gaussian source. Our results significantly improve (from Ackermann-like to "merely" exponential) the upper bounds recently proved on the above problems by De, Mossel & Neeman [CCC 2017, SODA 2018 resp.] and imply decidability of the larger alphabet case of the gap non-interactive simulation problem posed by Ghazi, Kamath & Sudan [FOCS 2016]. Our technique of dimension reduction for low-degree polynomials is simple and can be seen as a generalization of the Johnson-Lindenstrauss lemma and could be of independent interest.
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1741137 1650733
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10075657
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the annual ACM Symposium on Theory of Computing
ISSN:
0737-8017
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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