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Title: SFSU INCLUDES on SF CALL (Computing for All levels and learners)
n Fall 2016, our NSF INCLUDES pilot grant enabled us to develop a partnership and network (SF CALL K–20 ALLIANCE) to design and align a K–20 pathway to CS careers by broadening participation (1) at the K–12 level; (2) across key transitions between K–12 and college and at the college level; and (3) by coordinating cross–sector stakeholder support for K–20 STEM student success. We are targeting K–20 for Broadening Participation (BP) to provide entry and reentry pathways for careers in computing. SF CALL also supports the development of student leadership groups to create inclusive communities of practice. Further supporting the transition from college to industry, SFSU has partnered with the SF Chamber of Commerce and the South SF city government to develop industry internships for CS students. This is on-going project that touches a very wide spectrum of inclusive computing education from K-20 to teacher preparation. In this paper, we focus on our efforts to build inclusive partnerships among all stakeholders and create a network able to achieve the given goals.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1649277
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10078705
Journal Name:
2018 CoNECD - The Collaborative Network for Engineering and Computing Diversity Conference
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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