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Title: Photon-mediated interactions between quantum emitters in a diamond nanocavity

Photon-mediated interactions between quantum systems are essential for realizing quantum networks and scalable quantum information processing. We demonstrate such interactions between pairs of silicon-vacancy (SiV) color centers coupled to a diamond nanophotonic cavity. When the optical transitions of the two color centers are tuned into resonance, the coupling to the common cavity mode results in a coherent interaction between them, leading to spectrally resolved superradiant and subradiant states. We use the electronic spin degrees of freedom of the SiV centers to control these optically mediated interactions. Such controlled interactions will be crucial in developing cavity-mediated quantum gates between spin qubits and for realizing scalable quantum network nodes.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1734011
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10079145
Journal Name:
Science
Volume:
362
Issue:
6415
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
p. 662-665
ISSN:
0036-8075
Publisher:
American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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