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Title: Catalyst discovery through megalibraries of nanomaterials

The nanomaterial landscape is so vast that a high-throughput combinatorial approach is required to understand structure–function relationships. To address this challenge, an approach for the synthesis and screening of megalibraries of unique nanoscale features (>10,000,000) with tailorable location, size, and composition has been developed. Polymer pen lithography, a parallel lithographic technique, is combined with an ink spray-coating method to create pen arrays, where each pen has a different but deliberately chosen quantity and composition of ink. With this technique, gradients of Au-Cu bimetallic nanoparticles have been synthesized and then screened for activity by in situ Raman spectroscopy with respect to single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) growth. Au3Cu, a composition not previously known to catalyze SWNT growth, has been identified as the most active composition.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10081683
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Volume:
116
Issue:
1
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
p. 40-45
ISSN:
0027-8424
Publisher:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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