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Title: SecTap: Secure Back of Device Input System for Mobile Devices
Smart mobile devices have become an integral part of people's life and users often input sensitive information on these devices. However, various side channel attacks against mobile devices pose a plethora of serious threats against user security and privacy. To mitigate these attacks, we present a novel secure Back-of-Device (BoD) input system, SecTap, for mobile devices. To use SecTap, a user tilts her mobile device to move a cursor on the keyboard and tap the back of the device to secretly input data. We design a tap detection method by processing the stream of accelerometer readings to identify the user's taps in real time. The orientation sensor of the mobile device is used to control the direction and the speed of cursor movement. We also propose an obfuscation technique to randomly and effectively accelerate the cursor movement. This technique not only preserves the input performance but also keeps the adversary from inferring the tapped keys. Extensive empirical experiments were conducted on different smart phones to demonstrate the usability and security on both Android and iOS platforms.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1642124
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10082806
Journal Name:
IEEE Conference on Computer Communications (INFOCOM)
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1520 to 1528
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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