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Title: SocialAnnotator: Annotator Selection by Exploiting Social Relationships in Activity Recognition
Precise and eloquent label information is fundamental for interpreting the underlying data distributions distinctively and training of supervised and semi-supervised learning models adequately. But obtaining large amount of labeled data demands substantial manual effort. This obligation can be mitigated by acquiring labels of most informative data instances using Active Learning. However labels received from humans are not always reliable and poses the risk of introducing noisy class labels which will degrade the efficacy of a model instead of its improvement. In this paper, we address the problem of annotating sensor data instances of various Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) in smart home context. We exploit the interactions between the users and annotators in terms of relationships spanning across spatial and temporal space which accounts for an activity as well. We propose a novel annotator selection model SocialAnnotator which exploits the interactions between the users and annotators and rank the annotators based on their level of correspondence. We also introduce a novel approach to measure this correspondence distance using the spatial and temporal information of interactions, type of the relationships and activities. We validate our proposed SocialAnnotator framework in smart environments achieving ≈ 84% statistical confidence in data annotation
Authors:
;
Award ID(s):
1750936
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10087466
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the IEEE AAAI 2018 Fall Symposium, Oct 2018
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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