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Title: Serum-Free Manufacturing of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Tissue Rings Using Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells
Combination of stem cell technology and 3D biofabrication approaches provides physiological similarity to in vivo tissues and the capability of repairing and regenerating damaged human tissues. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been widely used for regenerative medicine applications because of their immunosuppressive properties and multipotent potentials. To obtain large amount of high-quality MSCs without patient donation and invasive procedures, we differentiated MSCs from human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC-MSCs) using serum-free E6 media supplemented with only one growth factor (bFGF) and two small molecules (SB431542 and CHIR99021). The differentiated cells showed a high expression of common MSC-specific surface markers (CD90, CD73, CD105, CD106, CD146, and CD166) and a high potency for osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. With these cells, we have been able to manufacture MSC tissue rings with high consistency and robustness in pluronic-coated reusable PDMS devices. The MSC tissue rings were characterized based on inner diameter and outer ring diameter and observed cell-type-dependent tissue contraction induced by cell-matrix interaction. Our approach of simplified hiPSC-MSC differentiation, modular fabrication procedure, and serum-free culture conditions has a great potential for scalable manufacturing of MSC tissue rings for different regenerative medicine applications.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1804875
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10089550
Journal Name:
Stem Cells International
Volume:
2019
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1 to 11
ISSN:
1687-966X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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    The differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) to prescribed cell fates enables the engineering of patient-specific tissue types, such as hyaline cartilage, for applications in regenerative medicine, disease modeling, and drug screening. In many cases, however, these differentiation approaches are poorly controlled and generate heterogeneous cell populations. Here, we demonstrate cartilaginous matrix production in three unique hiPSC lines using a robust and reproducible differentiation protocol. To purify chondroprogenitors (CPs) produced by this protocol, we engineered a COL2A1-GFP knock-in reporter hiPSC line by CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing. Purified CPs demonstrated an improved chondrogenic capacity compared with unselected populations. The ability to enrich for CPs and generate homogenous matrix without contaminating cell types will be essential for regenerative and disease modeling applications. Stem Cells  2019;37:65–76

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