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Title: Instrument Development: Measuring Undergraduate Students’ Perceived Support in STEM
This work-in-progress paper presents emerging results from a research study aiming to develop and gather validity evidence for an instrument that can be used by college administrators and student-support practitioners to assess the magnitude of undergraduate students’ perceived institutional support received in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Our goal is to provide stakeholders with a validated tool to diagnose areas of strength and opportunities to better support students, particularly those from underserved populations. Over the past year, we have engaged in a systematic process of instrument development. We began by developing a prototype based on the newly developed Model of Co-Curricular Support (MCCS). We refined it by reviewing existing literature and instruments germane to student support, and soliciting stakeholder feedback. During the spring of 2018, we distributed the instrument to STEM undergraduate students at three U.S. institutions. In this paper, we report our process of instrument development and preliminary results. These results will inform the next revision of our instrument, ultimately providing the STEM education community with novel and theory-based ways to measure students’ perceptions of support in STEM.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1704350
NSF-PAR ID:
10092332
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Frontiers in education
ISSN:
2504-284X
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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