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Title: Choose your own intervention: Using choice to enhance the effectiveness of a utility-value intervention.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1714481
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10093492
Journal Name:
Motivation Science
ISSN:
2333-8113
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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