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Title: Deploying Robust Security in Internet of Things
Popularization of the Internet-of-Things (IoT) has brought widespread concerns on IoT security, especially in face of several recent security incidents related to IoT devices. Due to the resource-constrained nature of many IoT devices, security offloading has been proposed to provide good-enough security for IoT with minimum overhead on the devices. In this paper, we investigate the inevitable risk associated with security offloading: the unprotected and unmonitored transmission from IoT devices to the offloaded security mechanisms. An important challenge in modeling the security risk is the dynamic nature of IoT due to demand fluctuations and infrastructure instability. We propose a stochastic model to capture both the expected and worst-case security risks of an IoT system. We then propose a framework to efficiently address the optimal robust deployment of security mechanisms in IoT. We use results from extensive simulations to demonstrate the superb performance and efficiency of our approach compared to several other algorithms.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1461886
NSF-PAR ID:
10098771
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
2018 IEEE Conference on Communications and Network Security (CNS)
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1 to 9
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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