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Title: Simulating 3-D Stellar Hydrodynamics using PPM and PPB Multifluid Gas Dynamics on CPU and CPU+GPU Nodes
The special computational challenges of simulating 3-D hydrodynamics in deep stellar interiors are discussed, and numerical algorithmic responses described. Results of recent simulations carried out at scale on the NSF's Blue Waters machine at the University of Illinois are presented, with a special focus on the computational challenges they address. Prospects for future work using GPU-accelerated nodes such as those on the DoE's new Summit machine at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are described, with a focus on numerical algorithmic accommodations that we believe will be necessary.
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1814181 1413548 1713200
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10101327
Journal Name:
Journal of physics. Conference series
Volume:
1225
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
012020
ISSN:
1742-6596
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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