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Title: A Systematic Review of the Convergence of Augmented Reality, Intelligent Virtual Agents, and the Internet of Things
In a seminal article on augmented reality (AR) [7], Ron Azuma defines AR as a variation of virtual reality (VR), which completely immerses a user inside a synthetic environment. Azuma says “In contrast, AR allows the user to see the real world, with virtual objects superimposed upon or composited with the real world” [7] (emphasis added). Typically, a user wears a tracked stereoscopic head-mounted display (HMD) or holds a smartphone, showing the real world through optical or video means, with superimposed graphics that provide the appearance of virtual content that is related to and registered with the real world. While AR has been around since the 1960s [72], it is experiencing a renaissance of development and consumer interest. With exciting products from Microsoft (HoloLens), Metavision (Meta 2), and others; Apple’s AR Developer’s Kit (ARKit); and well-funded startups like Magic Leap [54], the future is looking even brighter, expecting that AR technologies will be absorbed into our daily lives and have a strong influence on our society in the foreseeable future.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1800961
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10105846
Journal Name:
Transactions on computational science and computational intelligence
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
37
ISSN:
2569-7080
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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