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Title: Bilu-Linial Stability, Certified Algorithms and the Independent Set Problem
We study the classic Maximum Independent Set problem under the notion of stability introduced by Bilu and Linial (2010): a weighted instance of Independent Set is γ-stable if it has a unique optimal solution that remains the unique optimal solution under multiplicative perturbations of the weights by a factor of at most γ ≥ 1. The goal then is to efficiently recover this “pronounced” optimal solution exactly. In this work, we solve stable instances of Independent Set on several classes of graphs: we improve upon previous results by solving \tilde{O}(∆/sqrt(log ∆))-stable instances on graphs of maximum degree ∆, (k − 1)-stable instances on k-colorable graphs and (1 + ε)-stable instances on planar graphs (for any fixed ε > 0), using both combinatorial techniques as well as LPs and the Sherali-Adams hierarchy. For general graphs, we give an algorithm for (εn)-stable instances, for any fixed ε > 0, and lower bounds based on the planted clique conjecture. As a by-product of our techniques, we give algorithms as well as lower bounds for stable instances of Node Multiway Cut (a generalization of Edge Multiway Cut), by exploiting its connections to Vertex Cover. Furthermore, we prove a general structural result showing that the integrality more » gap of convex relaxations of several maximization problems reduces dramatically on stable instances. Moreover, we initiate the study of certified algorithms for Independent Set. The notion of a γ-certified algorithm was introduced very recently by Makarychev and Makarychev (2018) and it is a class of γ-approximation algorithms that satisfy one crucial property: the solution returned is optimal for a perturbation of the original instance, where perturbations are again multiplicative up to a factor of γ ≥ 1 (hence, such algorithms not only solve γ-stable instances optimally, but also have guarantees even on unstable instances). Here, we obtain ∆-certified algorithms for Independent Set on graphs of maximum degree ∆, and (1 + ε)-certified algorithms on planar graphs. Finally, we analyze the algorithm of Berman and Fürer (1994) and prove that it is a ((∆+1)/3 + ε)-certified algorithm for Independent Set on graphs of maximum degree ∆ where all weights are equal to 1. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1733556 1815011
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10112618
Journal Name:
27th Annual European Symposium on Algorithms (ESA 2019)
Volume:
27
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
25:1–25:16
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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