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Title: Choosing the future of Antarctica: a perspective looking back from 2070
We present two narratives on the future of Antarctica and the Southern Ocean, from the perspective of an observer looking back from 2070. In the first scenario, greenhouse gas emissions remained unchecked, the climate continued to warm, and the policy response was ineffective; this had large ramifications in Antarctica and the Southern Ocean, with worldwide impacts. In the second scenario, ambitious action was taken to limit greenhouse gas emissions and to establish policies that reduced anthropogenic pressure on the environment, slowing the rate of change in Antarctica. Choices made in the next decade will determine what trajectory is realized.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1664013
NSF-PAR ID:
10113503
Author(s) / Creator(s):
Date Published:
Journal Name:
AGU Fall Meeting
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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