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Title: Battery-Free Wireless Video Streaming Camera System
We design and prototype the first battery-free video streaming camera that harvests energy from both ambient light and RF signals. The RF signals are emitted by a nearby access point. The camera collects energy from both sources and backscatters up to 13 frames per second (fps) video at a distance of up to 150 ft in both outdoor and indoor environments. Compared to a single harvester powered by either ambient light or RF, our dual harvester design improves the camera's frame rate. Also, the dual harvester design maintains a steady 3 fps at distances beyond the RF energy harvesting range. To show efficacy of our battery-free video streaming camera for real applications such as surveillance and monitoring, we deploy our camera for a day-long experiment, from 8 AM to 4 PM, in an outdoor environment. Our results show that on a sunny day, our camera can provide a frame rate of up to 9 fps using a 4.5 cm×2.2 cm solar cell.
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1823148
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10114057
Journal Name:
2019 IEEE International Conference on RFID (RFID)
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1 to 8
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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