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Title: Prioritizing Amyloid Imaging Biomarkers in Alzheimer’s Disease via Learning to Rank
We propose an innovative machine learning paradigm enabling precision medicine for AD biomarker discovery. The paradigm tailors the imaging biomarker discovery process to individual characteristics of a given patient. We implement this paradigm using a newly developed learning-to-rank method 𝙿𝙻𝚃𝚁 . The 𝙿𝙻𝚃𝚁 model seamlessly integrates two objectives for joint optimization: pushing up relevant biomarkers and ranking among relevant biomarkers. The empirical study of 𝙿𝙻𝚃𝚁 conducted on the ADNI data yields promising results to identify and prioritize individual-specific amyloid imaging biomarkers based on the individual’s structural MRI data. The resulting top ranked imaging biomarker has the potential to aid personalized diagnosis and disease subtyping.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1837964
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10127256
Journal Name:
MBIA 2019: International Workshop on Multimodal Brain Image Analysis
Volume:
LNCS 11846
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
139-148
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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