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Title: Real-Time Tracking of Magnetoencephalographic Neuromarkers during a Dynamic Attention-Switching Task
In the last few years, a large number of experiments have been focused on exploring the possibility of using non-invasive techniques, such as electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG), to identify auditory-related neuromarkers which are modulated by attention. Results from several studies where participants listen to a story narrated by one speaker, while trying to ignore a different story narrated by a competing speaker, suggest the feasibility of extracting neuromarkers that demonstrate enhanced phase locking to the attended speech stream. These promising findings have the potential to be used in clinical applications, such as EEG-driven hearing aids. One major challenge in achieving this goal is the need to devise an algorithm capable of tracking these neuromarkers in real-time when individuals are given the freedom to repeatedly switch attention among speakers at will. Here we present an algorithm pipeline that is designed to efficiently recognize changes of neural speech tracking during a dynamic-attention switching task and to use them as an input for a near real-time state-space model that translates these neuromarkers into attentional state estimates with a minimal delay. This algorithm pipeline was tested with MEG data collected from participants who had the freedom to change the focus of their attention between two speakers at will. Results suggest the feasibility of using our algorithm pipeline to track changes of attention in near-real time in a dynamic auditory scene.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1734892
NSF-PAR ID:
10129422
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
2019 41st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC)
Page Range / eLocation ID:
4148 to 4151
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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