skip to main content

Title: Bridging Concepts and Practice in eScience via Simulation-driven Engineering
The CyberInfrastructure (CI) has been the object of intensive research and development in the last decade, resulting in a rich set of abstractions and interoperable software implementations that are used in production today for supporting ongoing and breakthrough scientific discoveries. A key challenge is the development of tools and application execution frameworks that are robust in current and emerging CI configurations, and that can anticipate the needs of upcoming CI applications. This paper presents WRENCH, a framework that enables simulation-driven engineering for evaluating and developing CI application execution frameworks. WRENCH provides a set of high-level simulation abstractions that serve as building blocks for developing custom simulators. These abstractions rely on the scalable and accurate simulation models that are provided by the SimGrid simulation framework. Consequently, WRENCH makes it possible to build, with minimum software development effort, simulators that that can accurately and scalably simulate a wide spectrum of large and complex CI scenarios. These simulators can then be used to evaluate and/or compare alternate platform, system, and algorithm designs, so as to drive the development of CI solutions for current and emerging applications.
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1642369
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10134276
Journal Name:
Workshop on Bridging from Concepts to Data and Computation for eScience (BC2DC’19), 15th International Conference on eScience (eScience)
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
609-614
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
More Like this
  1. Scientific workflows are used routinely in numerous scientific domains, and Workflow Management Systems (WMSs) have been developed to orchestrate and optimize workflow executions on distributed platforms. WMSs are complex software systems that interact with complex software infrastructures. Most WMS research and development activities rely on empirical experiments conducted with full-fledged software stacks on actual hardware platforms. Such experiments, however, are limited to hardware and software infrastructures at hand and can be labor- and/or time-intensive. As a result, relying solely on real-world experiments impedes WMS research and development. An alternative is to conduct experiments in simulation. In this work we presentmore »WRENCH, a WMS simulation framework, whose objectives are (i)~accurate and scalable simulations; and (ii)~easy simulation software development. WRENCH achieves its first objective by building on the SimGrid framework. While SimGrid is recognized for the accuracy and scalability of its simulation models, it only provides low-level simulation abstractions and thus large software development efforts are required when implementing simulators of complex systems. WRENCH thus achieves its second objective by providing high-level and directly re-usable simulation abstractions on top of SimGrid. After describing and giving rationales for WRENCH's software architecture and APIs, we present a case study in which we apply WRENCH to simulate the Pegasus production WMS. We report on ease of implementation, simulation accuracy, and simulation scalability so as to determine to which extent WRENCH achieves its two above objectives. We also draw both qualitative and quantitative comparisons with a previously proposed workflow simulator.« less
  2. Scientific workflows are used routinely in numerous scientific domains, and Workflow Management Systems (WMSs) have been developed to orchestrate and optimize workflow executions on distributed platforms. WMSs are complex software systems that interact with complex software infrastructures. Most WMS research and development activities rely on empirical experiments conducted with full-fledged software stacks on actual hardware platforms. Such experiments, however, are limited to hardware and software infrastructures at hand and can be labor- and/or time-intensive. As a result, relying solely on real-world experiments impedes WMS research and development. An alternative is to conduct experiments in simulation. In this work we presentmore »WRENCH, a WMS simulation framework, whose objectives are (i) accurate and scalable simulations; and (ii) easy simulation software development. WRENCH achieves its first objective by building on the SimGrid framework. While SimGrid is recognized for the accuracy and scalability of its simulation models, it only provides low-level simulation abstractions and thus large software development efforts are required when implementing simulators of complex systems. WRENCH thus achieves its second objective by providing high-level and directly re-usable simulation abstractions on top of SimGrid. After describing and giving rationales for WRENCH’s software architecture and APIs, we present a case study in which we apply WRENCH to simulate the Pegasus production WMS. We report on ease of implementation, simulation accuracy, and simulation scalability so as to determine to which extent WRENCH achieves its two above objectives. We also draw both qualitative and quantitative comparisons with a previously proposed workflow simulator.« less
  3. 1. Description of the objectives and motivation for the contribution to ECE education The demand for wireless data transmission capacity is increasing rapidly and this growth is expected to continue due to ongoing prevalence of cellular phones and new and emerging bandwidth-intensive applications that encompass high-definition video, unmanned aerial systems (UAS), intelligent transportation systems (ITS) including autonomous vehicles, and others. Meanwhile, vital military and public safety applications also depend on access to the radio frequency spectrum. To meet these demands, the US federal government is beginning to move from the proven but inefficient model of exclusive frequency assignments to amore »more-efficient, shared-spectrum approach in some bands of the radio frequency spectrum. A STEM workforce that understands the radio frequency spectrum and applications that use the spectrum is needed to further increase spectrum efficiency and cost-effectiveness of wireless systems over the next several decades to meet anticipated and unanticipated increases in wireless data capacity. 2. Relevant background including literature search examples if appropriate CISCO Systems’ annual survey indicates continued strong growth in demand for wireless data capacity. Meanwhile, undergraduate electrical and computer engineering courses in communication systems, electromagnetics, and networks tend to emphasize mathematical and theoretical fundamentals and higher-layer protocols, with less focus on fundamental concepts that are more specific to radio frequency wireless systems, including the physical and media access control layers of wireless communication systems and networks. An efficient way is needed to introduce basic RF system and spectrum concepts to undergraduate engineering students in courses such as those mentioned above who are unable to, or had not planned to take a full course in radio frequency / microwave engineering or wireless systems and networks. We have developed a series of interactive online modules that introduce concepts fundamental to wireless communications, the radio frequency spectrum, and spectrum sharing, and seek to present these concepts in context. The modules include interactive, JavaScript-based simulation exercises intended to reinforce the concepts that are presented in the modules through narrated slide presentations, text, and external links. Additional modules in development will introduce advanced undergraduate and graduate students and STEM professionals to configuration and programming of adaptive frequency-agile radios and spectrum management systems that can operate efficiently in congested radio frequency environments. Simulation exercises developed for the advanced modules allow both manual and automatic control of simulated radio links in timed, game-like simulations, and some exercises will enable students to select from among multiple pre-coded controller strategies and optionally edit the code before running the timed simulation. Additionally, we have developed infrastructure for running remote laboratory experiments that can also be embedded within the online modules, including a web-based user interface, an experiment management framework, and software defined radio (SDR) application software that runs in a wireless testbed initially developed for research. Although these experiments rely on limited hardware resources and introduce additional logistical considerations, they provide additional realism that may further challenge and motivate students. 3. Description of any assessment methods used to evaluate the effectiveness of the contribution, Each set of modules is preceded and followed by a survey. Each individual module is preceded by a quiz and followed by another quiz, with pre- and post-quiz questions drawn from the same pool. The pre-surveys allow students to opt in or out of having their survey and quiz results used anonymously in research. 4. Statement of results. The initial modules have been and are being used by three groups of students: (1) students in an undergraduate Introduction to Communication Systems course; (2) an interdisciplinary group of engineering students, including computer science students, who are participating in related undergraduate research project; and (3) students in a graduate-level communications course that includes both electrical and computer engineers. Analysis of results from the first group of students showed statistically significant increases from pre-quiz to post-quiz for each of four modules on fundamental wireless communication concepts. Results for the other students have not yet been analyzed, but also appear to show substantial pre-quiz to post-quiz increases in mean scores.« less
  4. Benchmarking is crucial for testing and validating any system, including—and perhaps especially—real-time systems. Typical real-time applications adhere to well-understood abstractions: they exhibit a periodic behavior, operate on a well-defined working set, and strive for stable response time, avoiding non-predicable factors such as page faults. Unfortunately, available benchmark suites fail to reflect key characteristics of real-time applications. Practitioners and researchers must resort to either benchmark heavily approximated real-time environments or re-engineer available benchmarks to add—if possible—the sought-after features. Additionally, the measuring and logging capabilities provided by most benchmark suites are not tailored “out-of-the-box” to real-time environments, and changing basic parameters suchmore »as the scheduling policy often becomes a tiring and error-prone exercise. In this paper, we present RT-bench, an open-source framework adding standard real-time features to virtually any existing benchmark. Furthermore, RT-bench provides an easy-to-use, unified command-line interface to customize key aspects of the real-time execution of a set of benchmarks. Our framework is guided by four main criteria: 1) cohesive interface, 2) support for periodic application behavior and deadline semantics, 3) controllable memory footprint, and 4) extensibility and portability. We have integrated within the framework applications from the widely used SD-VBS and IsolBench suites. We showcase a set of use-cases that are representative of typical real-time system evaluation scenarios, and that can be easily conducted via RT-Bench.« less
  5. Data-intensive applications in diverse domains, including video streaming, gaming, and health monitoring, increasingly require that mobile devices directly share data with each other. However, developing distributed data sharing functionality introduces low-level, brittle, and hard-to-maintain code into the mobile codebase. To reconcile the goals of programming convenience and performance efficiency, we present a novel middleware framework that enhances the Android platform's component model to support seamless and efficient inter-device data sharing. Our framework provides a familiar programming interface that extends the ubiquitous Android Inter-Component Communication (ICC), thus lowering the learning curve. Unlike middleware platforms based on the RPC paradigm, our programmingmore »abstractions require that mobile application developers think through and express explicitly data transmission patterns, thus treating latency as a first-class design concern. Our performance evaluation shows that using our framework incurs little performance overhead, comparable to that of custom-built implementations. By providing reusable programming abstractions that preserve component encapsulation, our framework enables Android devices to efficiently share data at the component level, providing powerful building blocks for the development of emerging distributed mobile applications.« less