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Title: Learning to Generalize Kinematic Models to Novel Objects
Robots operating in human environments must be capable of interacting with a wide variety of articulated objects such as cabinets, refrigerators, and drawers. Existing approaches require human demonstration or minutes of interaction to fit kinematic models to each novel object from scratch. We present a framework for estimating the kinematic model and configuration of previously unseen articulated objects, conditioned upon object type, from as little as a single observation. We train our system in simulation with a novel dataset of synthetic articulated objects; at runtime, our model can predict the shape and kinematic model of an object from depth sensor data. We demonstrate that our approach enables a MOVO robot to view an object with its RGB-D sensor, estimate its motion model, and use that estimate to interact with the object.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1844960
NSF-PAR ID:
10142730
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the 3rd Conference on Robot Learning
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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