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Title: Visual Identification of Articulated Object Parts
As autonomous robots interact and navigate around real-world environments such as homes, it is useful to reliably identify and manipulate articulated objects, such as doors and cabinets. Many prior works in object articulation identification require manipulation of the object, either by the robot or a human. While recent works have addressed predicting articulation types from visual observations alone, they often assume prior knowledge of category-level kinematic motion models or sequence of observations where the articulated parts are moving according to their kinematic constraints. In this work, we propose FormNet, a neural network that identifies the articulation mechanisms between pairs of object parts from a single frame of an RGB-D image and segmentation masks. The network is trained on 100k synthetic images of 149 articulated objects from 6 categories. Synthetic images are rendered via a photorealistic simulator with domain randomization. Our proposed model predicts motion residual flows of object parts, and these flows are used to determine the articulation type and parameters. The network achieves an articulation type classification accuracy of 82.5% on novel object instances in trained categories. Experiments also show how this method enables generalization to novel categories and can be applied to real-world images without fine-tuning.
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1925130 1956163
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10293237
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the IEEERSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems
ISSN:
2153-0866
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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