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Title: Kirigami-Based Deployable Transcrease Hard Stop Models Usable in Origami Patterns
Abstract

Stopping origami in arbitrary fold states can present a challenge for origami-based design. In this paper two categories of kirigami-based models are presented for stopping the fold motion of individual creases using deployable hard stops. These models are transcrease (across a crease) and deploy from a flat sheet. The first category is planar and has behavior similar to a four-bar linkage. The second category is spherical and behaves like a degree-4 origami vertex. These models are based on the zero-thickness assumption of paper and can be applied to origami patterns made from thin materials, limiting the motion of the base origami pattern through self-interference within the original facets. Model parameters are based on a desired fold or dihedral angle, as well as facet dimensions. Examples show model benefits and limitations.

 
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Award ID(s):
1663345
NSF-PAR ID:
10145104
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the 2019 International Design Engineering Conference
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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