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Title: The resolved size and structure of hot dust in the immediate vicinity of AGN
We use VLTI/GRAVITY near-infrared interferometry measurements of eight bright type 1 AGN to study the size and structure of hot dust that is heated by the central engine. We partially resolve each source, and report Gaussian full width at half-maximum sizes in the range 0.3−0.8 mas. In all but one object, we find no evidence for significant elongation or asymmetry (closure phases ≲1°). The narrow range of measured angular sizes is expected given the similar optical flux of our targets, and implies an increasing effective physical radius with bolometric luminosity, as found from previous reverberation and interferometry measurements. The measured sizes for Seyfert galaxies are systematically larger than for the two quasars in our sample when measured relative to the previously reported R  ∼  L 1/2 relationship, which is explained by emission at the sublimation radius. This could be evidence of an evolving near-infrared emission region structure as a function of central luminosity.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1909711
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10145285
Journal Name:
Astronomy & Astrophysics
Volume:
635
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
A92
ISSN:
0004-6361
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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