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Title: Spatial control of heavy-fermion superconductivity in CeIrIn 5
Although crystals of strongly correlated metals exhibit a diverse set of electronic ground states, few approaches exist for spatially modulating their properties. In this study, we demonstrate disorder-free control, on the micrometer scale, over the superconducting state in samples of the heavy-fermion superconductor CeIrIn 5 . We pattern crystals by focused ion beam milling to tailor the boundary conditions for the elastic deformation upon thermal contraction during cooling. The resulting nonuniform strain fields induce complex patterns of superconductivity, owing to the strong dependence of the transition temperature on the strength and direction of strain. These results showcase a generic approach to manipulating electronic order on micrometer length scales in strongly correlated matter without compromising the cleanliness, stoichiometry, or mean free path.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1719875
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10146241
Journal Name:
Science
Volume:
366
Issue:
6462
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
221 to 226
ISSN:
0036-8075
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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