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Title: Crystal growth and structural analysis of perovskite chalcogenide BaZrS 3 and Ruddlesden–Popper phase Ba 3 Zr 2 S 7
Perovskite chalcogenides are gaining substantial interest as an emerging class of semiconductors for optoelectronic applications. High-quality samples are of vital importance to examine their inherent physical properties. We report the successful crystal growth of the model system, BaZrS 3 and its Ruddlesden–Popper phase Ba 3 Zr 2 S 7 by a flux method. X-ray diffraction analyses showed the space group of Pnma with lattice constants of a = 7.056(3) Å, b = 9.962(4) Å, and c = 6.996(3) Å for BaZrS 3 and P 4 2 / mnm with a = 7.071(2) Å, b = 7.071(2) Å, and c = 25.418(5) Å for Ba 3 Zr 2 S 7 . Rocking curves with full width at half maximum of 0.011° for BaZrS 3 and 0.027° for Ba 3 Zr 2 S 7 were observed. Pole figure analysis, scanning transmission electron microscopy images, and electron diffraction patterns also establish the high quality of the grown crystals. The octahedral tilting in the corner-sharing octahedral network is analyzed by extracting the torsion angles.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1751736
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10147788
Journal Name:
Journal of Materials Research
Volume:
34
Issue:
22
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
3819 to 3826
ISSN:
0884-2914
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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Fig. 3(b) shows the tunneling probability T according to the Kane two-band model in the three materials, In0.53Ga0.47As, GaAs, and GaN, following our observation of a similar electroluminescence mechanism in GaN/AlN RTDs (due to strong polarization field of wurtzite structures) [8]. The expression is Tinter = (2/9)∙exp[(-2 ∙Ug 2 ∙me)/(2h∙P∙E)], where Ug is the bandgap energy, P is the valence-to-conduction-band momentum matrix element, and E is the electric field. Values for the highest calculated internal E fields for the InGaAs and GaN are also shown, indicating that Tinter in those structures approaches values of ~10-5. As shown, a GaAs RTD would require an internal field of ~6×105 V/cm, which is rarely realized in standard GaAs RTDs, perhaps explaining why there have been few if any reports of room-temperature electroluminescence in the GaAs devices. [1] E.R. Brown,et al., Appl. Phys. Lett., vol. 58, 2291, 1991. [5] S. 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